HighfiveConferenceRoom.jpg 3 Problems Still Facing Voice Services Alexey Aylarov September 04, 2019 Interconnectivity, teleconference audio quality, and robocalling issues are still impacting voice services. Don’t Get Ripped Off with Video Conferencing Pricing Chris Heinemann July 30, 2019 Financially, the cost of video conferencing isn’t just high, it’s unpredictable. It’s time for a different approach. The dual trends of increased remote working and a shift to more open and shared collaborative in-office workspaces are changing how we think about the ways we conduct business. Walls have disappeared, huddle rooms and communal spaces have popped up, and team-based work has begun to replace individual contributions. Which got me to thinking: How truly connected are remote workers?As revealed in a Harvard Business Review poll, the answer may be “not very.” In the poll, remote workers indicated they often feel isolated or left out when it comes to true collaboration with their colleagues.The shift in how people work is accelerating due to the rise of younger, tech-first workers. Millennials aged 21 to 36 — already the largest generation in the U.S. labor force — will account for more than 75% of the workforce by 2025, according to the Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. Today’s younger workers not only are more comfortable working in groups and collaborating, but also desire an always-on, uber-connected workplace.So, what can your organization do to connect and engage with an increasingly dispersed workforce? A good place to start is with a combination of smart meeting spaces with intuitive software. In the past, two factors hindered the ability to create a more dynamic meeting space in multiple locations:Cost and complexity of setting up and operating a more connected meeting roomQuality of the meeting itselfAdditionally, non-integrated software and hardware platforms present various hurdles to a more efficient intelligent meeting. Users struggle with PIN codes, dial-in numbers, passwords, downloads, and plug-ins — common challenges we’ve all experienced over the years.The intelligent meeting room overcomes these hurdles with integrated hardware that’s powered by smarter software for a more enjoyable experience by both IT and end users. In a Highfive meeting room, participants don’t need to fumble with technology or suffer through a poor quality experience. Rather, they enjoy a more usable, collaborative environment. Highfive has always delivered an integrated, intelligent platform that makes for an easy, more seamless and collaborative meeting room experience.This approach has been the Highfive model, or what we like to call Meetings Reimagined. Highfive delivered the first integrated hardware and software platform more than five years ago, the only video conferencing solution built on WebRTC and running on the Amazon Web Services hyperscale cloud. This puts elegant hardware paired with smart software into every intelligent meeting room, delivering the audio and video intelligence needed to deliver exceptional, low-touch, high-quality meetings complemented by enablement, support, and services. Then, Highfive ties it all together with an affordable monthly per-room subscription, eliminating the need and additional cost of individual user licenses. And because Highfive was built on WebRTC from the start, meetings start within the browser with no software download required, and every meeting starts on time with just a single click from any meeting room or any device.With expanding remote workforces, multiple company locations, and more geographically dispersed partners and customers, the intelligent meeting isn’t a nice-have, but a must-have. Video conferencing technology should bring us closer together as our workplaces become more diverse, making us more empowered, efficient, and productive.If you’d like to take a deeper dive into what makes an intelligent meeting work, check out the recent evaluation by Let’s Do Video.Tags:News & Viewsintelligent meetingsconnected meeting roomHighfiveVideo Collaboration & A/VDigital WorkplaceEndpointsFuture of WorkSponsored PostVCaaS Articles You Might Like Video Communication Must Improve, Even as It Hits Its Stride Michael Helmbrecht September 12, 2019 Video conferencing at work has boomed. Now we need to fully deliver on its promise. What’s Up in AV? 4 Trends to Watch Jimmy Vaughan August 02, 2019 A look at some of the problem-solving solutions I saw at the recent InfoComm 2019 event. Meetings Made Easy: One Video Platform or More Beth Schultz September 09, 2019 Standardizing on a single platform or enabling platform-agnostic collaboration are two ways to go about reducing friction in the meeting room. Log in or register to post comments See All in Video Collaboration & A/V » read more

Talk about bucking the trend.A Hamilton based company is pulling it’s manufacturing out of China and instead will be making a new, highly sought after product in Stoney Creek.Superior Radiant Products produces high efficiency infrared heating systems. It has just opened a 43,000 square foot facility to help meet an increased demand for outdoor heaters.“The new products are patio heaters, you’ve probably seen them. They keep you warm in these cold evening we’ve had especially this summer. We produce a high end version of that product. We were originally manufacturing it in China but we’ve now brought that product back to North America and we’re going to manufacture it right here in Stoney Creek,” says SRP President Kevin Merritt.The new factory is located in the old Levi’s plant. Along with increase in demand for the product, the company has increased its staff by almost 15%. read more

Three people have been charged with impaired driving after several crashes happened overnight in Hamilton.At around 3:30 a.m., a taxi cab was t-boned by a black BMW at the intersection of John St. and Hunter St.Witnesses say the male driver of the BMW fled the area on foot but Hamilton police caught up with him on Augusta St. where he was arrested for impaired driving.Police say two other collisions happened just after midnight in Flamborough and Hamilton.Police arrested a 22-year-old man after his car rolled into a ditch and a 24-year-old female driver was charged with impaired driving when her vehicle crashed into a pole.A male driver was arrested in Waterdown after he lost control of his truck and slammed into a pole — shearing it in half and trapping the driver inside his vehicle. He has been with careless driving and given a 3-day alcohol-warn suspension.Hamilton police say only minor injuries were reported. read more

Twenty-year-old Dylon Duarte appeared briefly at the John Sopinka Courthouse after facing murder charges in the stabbing death of Tyquan Brown.Hamilton police say, the night he was stabbed to death, Brown had been out celebrating the Toronto Raptors playoff win when Duarte drove by and saw his ex-girlfriend speaking with Brown and his friends. Brown was stabbed seconds later. Police officers found him bleeding in an alley and tried to revive him he was pronounced dead in hospital.Brown becomes the city’s fifth homicide victim of 2019.Duarte was told he would be back in court via video on June 27.

PHOENIX — Nike announced Thursday it’s going forward with plans to make soles for Nike Air shoes in a Phoenix suburb even though Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey blocked state money for the facility when the company pulled a flag-themed shoe from the market.The shoemaker did not address the controversy in announcing its plans for a $184 million factory with at least 500 jobs in Goodyear.Despite his earlier criticism, Ducey welcomed Nike to Arizona on Thursday.“This is good news for Arizona and for @GoodyearAZGov,” he wrote on Twitter. “500 plus jobs. Over $184 million in capital investment. Arizona is open for business, and we welcome @Nike to our state.”Nike faced criticism last week for its decision not to sell the Nike Air Max 1 USA shoe, which included a Revolutionary-era emblem known as the Betsy Ross flag.Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who has a high-profile endorsement deal with Nike, told the company the flag recalls an era when black people were enslaved and that it has been appropriated by white nationalist groups, a person familiar with the conversation told The Associated Press last week.“Arizona’s economy is doing just fine without Nike,” Ducey wrote on Twitter. “We don’t need to suck up to companies that consciously denigrate our nation’s history.”He said he’s “embarrassed for Nike,” called its decision “a shameful retreat” and ordered the Arizona Commerce Authority to withdraw a grant of up to $1 million.But Nike will still get more than $2 million in tax breaks from the city of Goodyear, where Nike said it will begin work on the facility later this year and begin making soles in 2020. It will be the third U.S. manufacturing centre for Nike Air.The company, based in Beaverton, Oregon, recently expanded plants in its home state and Missouri.Jonathan J. Cooper, The Associated Press read more

Companies in this story: (TSX:AW.UN)The Canadian Press VANCOUVER — A&W Revenue Royalties Income Fund has boosted its monthly distribution after a quarter of improved earnings from same-store sales growth and added stores.The Vancouver-based fund says it will boost its monthly cash distribution from 15.4 cents to 15.9 cents starting with the July distribution.It says it made $7.55 million in the quarter ending June 16, up from $7.08 million for the same quarter last year.Analysts had expected earnings of $7.93 million according to the financial markets data firm Refinitiv.The fund says it had same store sales growth of 10.3 per cent in the quarter, compared with 6.6 per cent in same store growth last year.Gross sales came in at $351.85 million from 934 stores, compared with $305.13 million from its 896 stores last year. read more

FRANKFURT — Like a sleek Mercedes crunched between two freight trucks, Europe’s economy is being knocked off course by the conflict between the U.S. and China over trade.The bill for damages from the U.S-China collision could be painfully high, starting this week if new growth figures on Wednesday show that Europe’s economic motor, Germany, is stalled or shrinking. Beyond that, economists say there are signs that years of jobs growth since the depths of the Great Recession and the eurozone debt crisis may be ending.And if the trade wars escalate to include higher U.S. tariffs on cars made in Europe, the picture could look even worse.The heart of the matter is Germany, Europe’s largest economy and a key trade partner of both the U.S. and China.Almost half the German economy – 47%, according to World Bank estimates – comes from trade as its companies play a dominant role in global markets for luxury autos and complex industrial machinery. Supply chains from Germany extend into neighbouring countries as well, while German profits are often invested in factories in places like Slovakia, Hungary and Poland. Great for Germany and Europe when trade is booming — but it means Germany remains more vulnerable than less open economies such as Portugal or France to a slowdown in global trade in goods and services.And that is what’s happening.German has spewed wretched economic data for weeks: an 8% annual fall in exports in June, a 1.5% drop in industrial production in June from the month before, three times bigger than expected. Surveys of company executives suggest the industrial sector is in recession, with consumer demand and services propping up the economy.But the damage from trade may be spreading to consumers and companies that do business only at home. While unemployment remains low at 3.1%, job gains have stalled recently.Ironically, trade between Germany and the U.S. and between Germany and China is holding up pretty well. It’s mainly the uncertainty about the outcome of the clash between U.S. President Donald Trump and the Chinese Communist leadership that has been weighing on business confidence and deterring decisions to invest and buy across global markets. Last week, Trump imposed a 10% tariff on an additional $300 billion in Chinese goods effective Sept. 1.As a result, research firm Oxford Economics forecasts world trade growth of just 1.2% this year, far below last year’s 4.9% rise.There are a few small benefits for Europe. While the U.S. and China ramped up barriers against each other, the U.S. has largely kept tariffs on European products the same, except for introducing charges on steel and aluminum imports. China has actually lowered charges on exports from the 19 European countries that use the euro.“That mildly positive effect for the eurozone has been, however, more than offset by the hit to business sentiment and demand,” says economist Florian Hense at Berenberg bank. “As uncertainty about the future trading regime is pervasive, businesses have cut their outlook and their investment plans. The slowdown in Chinese actual and potential growth, which the trade tensions have exacerbated, also weighs on demand for eurozone exports.”Trump has recently repeated threats to increase tariffs on autos if he does not get a satisfactory new trade deal with the EU.Germany’s top companies issued cautious outlooks along with their earnings for the most recent quarter, even those that are doing relatively well. Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess warned that “growing protectionism also poses major challenges for the globally integrated auto industry.” Siemens AG CEO Joe Kaeser said that “geopolitics and geo-economics are harming an otherwise positive investment sentiment.”The auto industry in particular, with its dependence on demand from operations in China, looks less healthy. Daimler, maker of Mercedes-Benz luxury cars, has issued four profit warnings over 18 months and saw its first quarterly loss since 2009. BMW lost money on its autos business in the first quarter for the first time in a decade.Some of Europe’s troubles can’t be blamed on the trade dispute. The auto industry is under pressure to meet lower greenhouse gas emissions limits imposed by the European Union. Automakers had expected to rely on more fuel-efficient diesels to help meet the requirements, but saw diesel sales plunge after Volkswagen was caught in 2015 cheating on diesel emissions tests.Another source of uncertainty is Britain’s impending departure from the EU, currently set for Oct. 31. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he wants to leave without an extension even if that means no divorce deal to smooth trade.In an effort to ward off a steeper slowdown or possible recession, the European Central Bank has signalled it could provide more monetary stimulus at its Sept. 12 meeting, including new purchases of bonds, which pump newly created money into the economy. It’s a measure of Europe’s reversal of fortune that a four-year, 2.6 trillion-euro ($2.9 trillion) bond purchase program was halted only in December.“What is hurting German exports currently is the uncertainty which has spread across the globe and has also paralyzed many European economies,” said Carsten Brzeski, chief economist for Germany at ING. “Looking ahead, the outlook for German exporters is clearly in the hands of the U.S. and China.”David McHugh, The Associated Press read more

NEW YORK — Shares of connected exercise machine company Peloton are drifting lower in their first day of public trading.The New York company’s stock opened at $27. It offered 40 million shares at an initial public offering price of $29 per share, the high end of an expected range of $26 to $29 apiece.Peloton is known for its stationary bikes that allow users to stream workouts live or on-demand. Users pay thousands of dollars for Peloton machines and about $40 per month for a subscription. The company also makes high-end treadmills that cost more than $4,000.Peloton Interactive Inc., founded in 2012, is listed on the Nasdaq under the “PTON” ticker symbol.The Associated Press

Aceto was president and CEO of online bank Tangerine, formerly ING Direct Canada, from 2008 to 2017.Scotiabank acquired ING Direct Canada in 2012, and later changed its name to Tangerine.Aceto’s appointment as CannTrust CEO comes just weeks before Canada legalizes marijuana for recreational use on Oct. 17. TORONTO — The former chief executive of Scotiabank’s online bank Tangerine is now CEO of marijuana company CannTrust.The Ontario-based licensed medical cannabis producer says Peter Aceto has been appointed to the top job, effective immediately.Canadian cannabis companies on $2-billion fundraising spree as legalization loomsCanadian-listed marijuana companies with U.S. operations warned of delistingCannTrust says co-founder and CEO Eric Paul has stepped down from his role at the helm and has been named chairman of the board and special adviser.Former Tangerine CEO Peter Aceto is now chief executive officer of marijuana company CannTrust. Galit Rodan/Bloomberg read more

A 56-year-old man and 51-year-old woman from Norfolk were charged with trafficking this week after fentanyl and methamphetamine were seized in a drug raid in Simcoe.The search warrant was executed Thursday at a home on Queen Street South. Cash was also seized during the investigation.“Our community street crimes unit has been very effective with proactive illicit drug investigations,” Insp. Joe Varga, head of the Norfolk OPP, said Friday in a news release“We will continue to target individuals who endanger lives in our community. This is yet another example that highlights the need for police and the community to work in partnership to resolve crime.”The man and woman are each charged with possession of methamphetamine for the purposes of trafficking. The man is also charged with possession of fentanyl for the purposes of trafficking. read more