first_imgAdvertisement You are welcome to submit in more than one category—you just have to fill out a different form for each one. And obviously, you’ll want to focus on achievements that are relevant to each category you’re submitting in.CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT AND/OR FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONIn October, we’ll invite all Kidscreen readers to review the submissions online and tell us which company they think is tops in each category. (We know what you’re thinking, but don’t worry! Our system only allows bona fide Kidscreen subscribers to vote, and only one time in each category.)The Kidscreen Hot50 will be determined by tallying these votes, and we will announce the final rankings on December 17 in our Kidscreen Daily newsletter and with a press release to all relevant trade media.Companies that make it into the Kidscreen Hot50 will be featured in a special digital issue launching on December 17, as well as a print insert that will be distributed with 2,100 copies of Kidscreen‘s February/March issue at Kidscreen Summit 2019. They will also be presented with a commemorative trophy as part of our high-profile Kidscreen Awards ceremony at the Summit. Plus we’ll showcase the Kidscreen Hot50 companies on a dedicated microsite for a full year, and then archive this content so it’s still searchable and accessible online.CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT AND/OR FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Kidscreen will once again rank and profile the world’s top 50 kids entertainment companies at the end of the year. If you want to be in the Hot50 mix, now is the time to put your hat in the ring.We’re accepting submissions until Friday, August 10—and it’s totally FREE! All you have to do is fill out an easy online form and tell us about your company’s three biggest achievements from the last 12 months in one of these business categories:PRODUCTIONDISTRIBUTIONBROADCASTINGLICENSINGDIGITAL MEDIA Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebookcenter_img . Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgAdvertisement Minister of Foreign Affairs2 With America on sabbatical as global defender of human rights, Freeland has leapt into the void. In August, she called out MBS, the power-mad Saudi prince, for jailing a women’s rights activist. When he levied sanctions, kicked out Canada’s ambassador and ordered all Saudi students to leave Canada, Freeland doubled down, stating that Canada was “very comfortable with its position.” A month later, she appeared on a panel called “Taking on the Tyrant,” which featured a video montage of Trump alongside autocrats like Syria’s Bashar al-Assad and China’s Xi Jinping. The timing didn’t help her relationship with POTUS, who was growing frustrated with the stalled NAFTA talks. “We don’t like their representative very much,” he said of Freeland, who remained characteristically unfazed. For the umpteenth time in 2018, she visited Washington in pursuit of a favourable agreement for Canada. Finally, in October, she secured a deal that protects Canada’s vital industries and, rebrand aside, isn’t so different from its predecessor. Friends in high places: In April, Freeland hosted all the G7 foreign ministers for brunch at her Summerhill house.Markian LozowchukJOHN TORYMayor3 Call him bland or a ditherer, but he must have done something right to nab 63 per cent of the vote. Tory is a no-surprises maintenance man who worries, so we don’t have to, about all the unsexy stuff that keeps our metropolis running. To his credit, he has proved a smooth operator, pushing through overdue TTC improvements (express buses and reduced fares for people with disabilities, for two), forming committees (on important but dull stuff like construction road closures) that get things done, and avoiding major strikes and service disruptions. We also take for granted his steadiness when confronted with the previously unimaginable horrors of mass shootings and van attacks on our streets. Right now, with the sheer craziness to the south and the rule-by-spite at Queen’s Park, it’s nice to have Mister Reliable minding city hall. Up next:Funding for his SmartTrack transit plan finally won approval at council, but the entire thing could be a wash if he doesn’t get on the premier’s good side.Getty ImagesDRAKEMusician4 In 1966, John Lennon said the Beatles were bigger than Jesus. In 2018, Billboard decreed Drake was bigger than the Beatles when he smashed a longstanding Fab Four record: seven of his songs appeared on the Top 10 simultaneously. Also this year, he opened the sports joint Pick 6ix, reunited the Degrassi crew for the “I’m Upset” music video, produced the police-violence film Monsters and Men, and delivered the song of the summer, “In My Feelings.” All of this matters because, outside of Canada, the first—and sometimes only—thing millions of people know about Toronto is that it’s Drake’s hometown. When he looks good, so do we. Charity circuit: He blew his “God’s Plan” video budget (roughly $1.23 million) on shopping sprees, university scholarships and other charitable causes for the people of Miami.Daniel EhrenworthJORDAN PETERSONAuthor5 In the course of a year, Peterson went from eccentric prof to global phenomenon. His 12 Rules for Life, a self-help guide to enjoying a more enlightened existence, topped bestseller lists around the world. The New York Times columnist David Brooks called him “the most influential public intellectual in the Western world,” and by the fall, his book had sold more than two million copies. Up next: Pursuing defamation lawsuits he’s launched against two Laurier professors and a former staff member who compared him to Hitler.Getty ImagesMARGARET ATWOODAuthor6 Atwood’s fictional worlds have never been more alive in popular culture. Alias Grace earned critical fawning and roughly four million viewers on CBC plus millions more on Netflix. Season two of The Handmaid’s Tale was as good as—if bleaker than—the first. Even if the Emmys semi-snubbed the show (20 nods but no major wins), viewers didn’t; the season two premiere attracted twice the audience of the original’s. Women in red robes and white wings popped up to protest the Kavanaugh confirmation in Washington, to rally for abortion rights in Argentina, to stage an operatic Handmaid’s Tale adaptation in Australia. Up next: Season three of The Handmaid’s Tale.Getty ImagesCAROLINE MULRONEYAttorney General7 The Harvard- and NYU-educated quadrilingual descendant of Canadian political royalty brings sophistication to an often pugnacious regime. When Ford wanted to deploy the notwithstanding clause to ram his council-slashing bill through the legislature, he tasked Mulroney with publicly defending it, then called on her again to spearhead the tricky cannabis file. Lately, she’s been touring the province and meeting with business owners who want to repeal the Liberal government’s efforts to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Friends in high places: George W. Bush and Queen Noor of Jordan attended her 2000 wedding to Andrew Lapham.Getty ImagesSTEPHEN POLOZGovernor of the Bank of Canada8 Poloz decides when to lower the Bank’s overnight rate and when to raise it, an equation that affects the worth of the dollar and the interest rate Torontonians pay on our gargantuan mortgages. Over the past five years, his other decisions have lessened the blow of Alberta’s oil collapse, kept inflation on target and wrangled unemployment to a four-decade low. This year, when POTUS threw a trade temper tantrum, Poloz boldly raised the overnight rate from 1.25 to 1.5 per cent, betting Canada would thrive despite a volley of tariffs. The arrival of USMCA proved him right. Up next: Before his term ends in June 2020, he’ll have to decide what to do with the overnight rate a dozen more times.Getty ImagesGUILLERMO DEL TORODirector9 The horror-fantasy auteur’s masterpiece, The Shape of Water,earned a field-leading 13 Oscar nominations. When it won four trophies, including Best Picture and Best Director, del Toro used his acceptance speech to crusade for inclusion and immigration. His success is a boon to the Toronto film industry: del Toro has been shooting here since 1997’s Mimic, and every blockbuster he films in Ontario means more money, work and prestige for local crews and studios. Up next: In 2019, he’ll produce the Keri Russell horror flick, Antlers, direct Pinocchio for Netflix, and—the truest indicator of iconic status—make an animated cameo on The Simpsons.Craig BoykoSTEPHAN JOSTDirector, Art Gallery of Ontario10 Stephan Jost kicked off 2018 with Guillermo del Toro’s Monsters exhibition, which drew 192,000 visitors. He followed it with Infinity Mirrors, a kaleidoscopic journey through a series of eye-popping rooms. That exhibit wasn’t just a success on Instagram; it was a financial boon (169,000 visitors) and confirmation that the AGO isn’t just for monocle-hoisters and art majors. It’s a cultural centre for all, an oasis of thought-provoking works, live concerts, evening yoga sessions and much more. Friends in high places: He’s on a first-name basis with the Obamas.Getty ImagesMARK SAUNDERSChief of Police11 Two catastrophes—the Yonge and Finch van attack and the Danforth shooting—and a string of violent incidents made the summer of 2018 memorable for all the wrong reasons. But when Constable Ken Lam stared down Alek Minassian at Yonge and Sheppard and chose to holster, rather than fire, his sidearm, the Toronto Police—and their leader, Saunders—became a symbol of everything that’s right about law enforcement, especially in the eyes of Americans fed up with police brutality. Up next: Modernizing the force by deploying officers where and when their presence is most needed, a reform that’s long been challenged by the union.Getty ImagesSHAWN MENDESPop star12 The kinder, gentler Justin Bieber is now eclipsing his forerunner. His self-titled 2018 album shot to the top of the Billboard 200 chart and earned him Billboard’s inaugural Artist of the Year award, the same honour he picked up at the MMVAs. He’s now a certified A-lister: he graced the cover of Variety’s Young Hollywood issue, attended his first Met Ball, scored an invite to Taylor Swift’s American Music Awards after-party (with a trophy in hand), made cameos on The Voice and Ellen, landed on Justin Trudeau’s summer playlist, rocked the Jingle Ball tour with Cardi B, received an adoring write-up in the Time 100 from his hero John Mayer and performed for the Queen. Dave Grohl called Mendes a “bad motherfucker”—a compliment in Foo speak. Oh, and did we mention he’s only 20 years old? Up next: Starring in an Ivan Reitman movie musical called Summer of Love. Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: Hardly anything went down in Toronto this year that didn’t bear the new premier’s imprimatur. Recreational pot became legal, but not before Ford steamrolled the pre-existing plans and implemented a framework for private sales. In September, students and teachers returned to the classroom unsure of whether they were allowed to call it a penis or a pee-pee or anything at all. A little over a month before voters went to the polls, Ford chucked the municipal electoral process into a blender. He roadblocked Trudeau’s carbon tax scheme, cancelled the basic income pilot and went on and on about the all-curing virtues of one-dollar beer. So steady was the firehose feed of news flowing from Queen’s Park that you’d be forgiven for not paying attention to the other influential Torontonians who were busy changing the world in 2018. Chrystia Freeland emerged semi-­victorious from her NAFTA arm-wrestle with Trump; Drake conquered the music world, and then Shawn Mendes did, too; a quirky Jungian psychology professor became the guiding light of a new global men’s movement; our adopted frightmeister, Guillermo del Toro, snagged four golden statuettes on Hollywood’s biggest stage; Jessica Mulroney became Pippa 2.0; and one brave, level-headed police officer at Yonge and Finch decided to holster his gun, rather than fire it—demonstrating to a world grappling anew with racism, bigotry and violence what Toronto is truly about.Markian LozowchukDOUG FORDPremier1 At the beginning of 2018, the Ford family circus seemed like a distant hallucinogenic memory. By year’s end, its wiliest son was running the province with a Lannisterian will. Doug, a few notches smarter than Rob, got to work right away, recalling the legislature for a rare summer session. With unprecedented speed and ferocity, he torched several of Kathleen Wynne’s signature initiatives: the cap-and-trade carbon emissions program (as well as a related $100-million school repair fund), the sex-ed curriculum, the Ontario Basic Income Pilot. He froze salaries for public service managers and halted new measures on police oversight. And, of course, he chopped Toronto city council in half, which was, depending on your point of view, either a brilliant cost-cutting move or a puerile act of vengeance. “Promise made, promise kept,” Ford said, with hashtag regularity. In other words, burn it all down. Up next: Figuring out how to balance the provincial budget, while keeping his promise not to slash jobs or services.Markian LozowchukCHRYSTIA FREELAND Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgFilming dates: July 15th to November 13th.Cast: Aidan Gillen, Michael Malarkey, Neal McDonough, Michael Harney, Laura Mennell and Ksenia Solo Between 1952 and 1969, the US Air Force investigated over 12,000 reported sightings of UFOs. This top-secret government program was codenamed Project Blue Book.History Channel’s hit UFO series Project Blue Book starts filming season 2 in Vancouver this summer. Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Project Blue Book ~Pictured: Aidan Gillen Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsBritish Columbia Supreme Court Justice Bruce Cohen released his report this week on the collapse of the Fraser River Sockeye Salmon.Millions of Sockeye disappeared in 2009 prompting a long and controversial public inquiry.However, despite 179 witnesses and 138 days of hearings, the report provided little answers.APTN National News reporter Rob Smith has the story.last_img

first_img(Photo from www.melaric.ca)By Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsTroubled suspended Senator Patrick Brazeau is headed to a drug and alcohol rehabilitation “resort” set in a bucolic environment with its own private lake, a community garden, bed-and- breakfast-type bedrooms along with volleyball and softball fields.Brazeau was sent to the Melaric rehab centre, which is about 133 kilometres east of Ottawa, by a Quebec provincial judge Friday as a result of negotiations between Crown prosecutor Stephany Robitaille and Gerard Larocque, the defence lawyer for the fallen Algonquin politician. Brazeau was released on $5,000 bail which required no deposit and the rehab centre was among a list of imposed conditions.Brazeau was facing the prospect of remaining in jail until his next court appearance on June 17 as a result of his latest run in with the law involving alleged domestic assault. Brazeau was charged by Gatineau police with assault, uttering threats, cocaine possession and breach of conditions following an incident involving his current girlfriend and another man early Thursday morning.Brazeau has pleaded not guilty.Brazeau wore the same dark sports jacket he wore for his initial appearance. His faced appeared to be scarred and swollen. He did not look at the gallery which was full of reporters awaiting his appearance. Brazeau fixed his gaze on the judge, saying only, “Yes sir, No problem, yes.”Brazeau was given 72 hours to get himself into the Melaric, but he is restricted to visiting only two addresses in the interim, that of his father’s and a friend’s home. Aside from having to refrain from drugs and alcohol, he was also given curfew forcing him to stay inside between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. Brazeau won’t be able to leave the rehab centre without permission, said Robitaille.Brazeau was also told to stay away from the woman he allegedly assaulted and Marc Lamontagne, the man he allegedly uttered threats against.Neither Robitaille nor Larocque would say how long Brazeau would remain in the rehab centre, which boasts hardwood floors, therapeutic baths and rooftop balconies overlooking a private lake. The self-described “resort,” also features a living room with a fireplace and at least one bedroom with a canopy over the bed, according to photos posted on Melaric’s website.Photo http://www.melaric.ca/It seemed Brazeau was fashioning a new life before everything shattered amid blue and red lights, shouting and white powder in the early morning hours Thursday.With his political career in shambles after he was suspended from the Senate, Brazeau seemed, on the surface, to have been reconstructing a new persona.He became involved with a woman he met a little over a year ago. Photos on their Facebook pages depicted a happy couple snuggling, gazing into each other’s eyes and showing off their arm tattoos. One photo featured Brazeau strumming a guitar and crooning to the woman.He had also landed a new job as the day manager of a strip bar in Ottawa’s trendy Market neighbourhood and seemed to relish the position. Brazeau was also preparing to referee a charity pro wrestling event in Smith Falls on May 10 featuring the famed Honky Tonk Man. In a video interview promoting the event, he even claimed that he threw his 2012 charity boxing match with Liberal leader Justin Trudeau to cash in on the three to one odds.Patrick Brazeau poses for a recent promotional for Great North Wrestling. Photo courtesy of Great North Wrestling.But that life ended up strewn on the snow in the backyard of the house owned by his latest love. His personal documents, photographs of his childhood, music CDs, letters, Senate business cards, a bag of marijuana and his sport jackets all were left piled in angry disorder.At the time of Thursday’s arrest, Brazeau was already on conditions from previous assault and sexual assault charges against another former partner. Brazeau was arrested by Gatineau police in February 2013 after police received two 911 calls from a woman.According to court documents, Brazeau choked and spat on the woman, grabbed her breasts and pushed her down the stairs. The documents also reveal that he pulled her pants down hard enough to snap a button and break a zipper.The allegations have not been tested in court.He was scheduled to appear Friday for a hearing to determine the trial date for those charges. That date was pushed to April 25.The trial for the February 2013 incident is expected to cross-pollinate with another set of charges laid by the RCMP in relation to a separate investigation into Senate expenses and housing allowance claims. Brazeau, along with retired Liberal Senator Mac Harb, were both charged with fraud and breach of trust this year following that investigation.Larocque, who is representing Brazeau in both Quebec cases, said he had obtained video of the RCMP’s interview of the victim from the February 2013 incident as part of a recent batch of disclosure. The woman was interviewed as part of the RCMP’s investigation into Brazeau’s housing allowance claims. Larocque hopes to use the video interview to test the woman’s credibility in the assault and sexual assault trial.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

first_imgAnnette Francis APTN News Child welfare advocate Cindy Blackstock has fought a lot of battles over the past 10 years.But she hasn’t been alone in pushing for equality for First Nations’ kids.A fuzzy little fellow named “Spirit Bear” has kept her company at each and every hearing, including the ground-breaking 2013 case against the federal government at the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.“I really wanted something in the room that reminded all of us about what this case is actually about, which was children,” said Blackstock, a Gitxsan activist and executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada.So it was only natural the stuffed animal, which was gifted to Blackstock by the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council in British Columbia, would help tell the story of the historical case.A book entitled “Spirit Bear and Children Make History” was released about a month ago.Blackstock said it’s geared towards children in Grades 2 to 6 as a way to help educate and create change.“If we can raise a generation of non-Indigenous children – who know about these inequities, who don’t accept these inequities or rationalize these inequities – that creates a better ground for those inequalities to end for First Nations’ kids,” she said.“Not only for children and young people and their families…but for university students and university professors, who look at this almost as a textbook because there’s so few cases – legal cases – where children have not just been the subjects of the law, they’ve been participants of the law and justice and reconciliation.”Spirit Bear has matured right alongside Blackstock, obtaining a law degree, setting up a Twitter account and, by this time next year, starring in an animated short film.“We’ll all have to figure out what Spirit Bear sounds like, that’s going to be our next little task,” said Blackstock with a chuckle.Proceeds from the self-published book will be donated to children’s reconciliation projects. It sells for $15 from info@fncaringsociety.com.last_img read more

first_img(The Westridge marine terminal in Burnaby, B.C., pictured here, is the end point for the Trans Mountain pipeline. Lindsay Sample/The Discourse)The Canadian PressThe Supreme Court has dismissed an appeal by the City of Burnaby on construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, one of the last court challenges to a project that has pitted British Columbia and First Nations against Alberta and Ottawa.Burnaby asked the country’s highest court last spring to consider a lower court decision that denied the port city leave to appeal a ruling by the National Energy Board.That ruling allowed Kinder Morgan to bypass local bylaws during construction of the pipeline expansion, which would triple the amount of diluted bitumen and other oil products moving between the Edmonton-area and port facilities in Burnaby.The federal government approved the pipeline expansion in 2016, but the project faces significant opposition in B.C.Thousands of people have rallied in protest and the provincial government has raised concerns about the pipeline’s possible environmental and economic impact.Burnaby had appealed the NEB’s decision to the Federal Court of Appeal, which dismissed the appeal with costs on March 23.last_img read more

first_imgTodd LamirandeAPTN NewsThe Liberal dominated ethics committee voted down an opposition motion that would have called on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to allow former Attorney General Jody Wilson-Raybould to speak freely.This is the second committee where the opposition has failed to convince their Liberal colleagues to allow Wilson-Raybould, and former Treasury Board president Jane Philpott to speak more about the SNC-Lavalin case.“The coverup continues,” Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre said after the meeting ended.Wilson-Raybould told the justice House of Commons justice committee last month that she was pressured by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his senior advisers and senior ad visors to the finance minister, to overrule the decision by the director of public prosecutions not to negotiate a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin rather than proceed to a criminal trial on fraud charges.She believes she was shuffled out of justice in January because she wouldn’t change her mind.Trudeau has denied anything improper occurred but has been unable to change the channel from the saga that has badly hurt his public image. He said the whole thing boils down to a breakdown in trust between him, his aides and Wilson-Raybould.During the almost two-hour-long meeting Tuesday, Conservatives and New Democrats urged their Liberal colleagues to put partisan issues aside and agree to have the ethics committee take on the probe after the Liberals ended the justice committee’s investigation last week.Liberal MP Nathaniel Ermine-Smith, who voted in favour of an NDP motion in February to hold a public inquiry on the matter, said at the ethics committee Tuesday a new probe may only result in relitigating what has already been said at the unless the two former cabinet ministers were granted wider waivers to testify on the issue.Trudeau has not indicated any willingness to do that saying the waivers were already unprecedented and allowed for the facts relevant to the matter at hand to be made public.The justice committee heard from 10 witnesses over five meetings but opposition parties say Wilson-Raybould named 11 people who she felt crossed the line and all of them should be asked to testify. Only two of those people were among the witnesses the justice committee did hear from.Trudeau faced renewed questions about the controversy during a morning event in Winnipeg where he was trying to promote his government’s budget introduced one week ago. He would not, however, say whether he rejected Wilson-Raybould’s 2017 recommendation for chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada.Sources told The Canadian Press that Trudeau turned down Wilson-Raybould’s recommendation that Glenn Joyal be elevated from chief justice of Manitoba’s Court of Queen’s Bench to chief justice of the Supreme Court over Joyal’s views on the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.Shortly after Trudeau told Wilson-Raybould he did not support her choice, the sources said Joyal withdrew his name from consideration.In a statement Monday, Joyal said he submitted an application for consideration for the Supreme Court in 2017, only to be forced to withdraw his name for personal reasons related to his wife’s health.Instead, Trudeau appointed Sheila Martin to the high court and named Richard Wagner as chief justice. Former Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper appointed Wagner to the high court.Trudeau said Tuesday he would not discuss the matter nor would he say whether his office was involved in the leak of what is usually a highly confidential appointments process.Trudeau said it is the prime minister’s choice of who to nominate for the Supreme Court, as well as for chief justice, and that Canadians can and should continue to have faith in their judicial system.Speaking at the ethics committee meeting, Kent said the breach of a highly confidential judicial appointment process would warrant a parliamentary investigation on its own. He also said the story could compromise the integrity of the appointment process, and possibly some sitting justices.tlamirande@aptn.ca@toddlamirande-with files from the Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgVANCOUVER – Hecla Mining Co. says it’s buying Vancouver-based gold miner Klondex Mines Ltd. for $605 million with a mix of cash and shares.Idaho-based Hecla will gain control of Klondex’s Fire Creek, Midas, and Hollister underground gold mines in Nevada, while Klondex will spin out its True North mining operations in Manitoba into a new entity for existing shareholders.Hecla says its focus is high-grade underground mines so Klondex’s operations will fit well into the company and add production while minimizing dilution.Klondex produced 189,500 gold equivalent ounces in 2017, short of its guidance of between 210,000 and 225,000 ounces.News of the deal helped send Klondex’s share price up 62.2 per cent to $2.92 in midday trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange, though well off the $7.54 high the stock traded at in September 2016.Along with operations in Alaska, Idaho and Mexico, Hecla also runs the Casa Berardi mine in Quebec where it recently secured a $40 million loan for expansion from Investissement Quebec.last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA – Conservatives say it might help Canada’s bargaining position on the North American Free Trade Agreement if the Liberal government were to agree to American demands that it join the U.S. continental missile defence system.However, leader Andrew Scheer said Wednesday he still thinks there is a chance to preserve NAFTA as a trilateral trade deal between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, and that Canada shouldn’t give in to one-on-one trade talks with the U.S. yet.Scheer’s interim predecessor Rona Ambrose warned last month it would be “dangerous” for the Conservatives to attack the government as it tries to get a new NAFTA deal, fearing it would look as though they were siding with President Donald Trump.On Wednesday, Scheer continued to express support for the government in some areas, but sharpened his attack in others.He didn’t reject outright the notion of a bilateral trade deal with the United States, but said Canada should continue to focus on renegotiating the full three-country deal.“I believe as long as it’s possible to preserve NAFTA, all three parties, that should of course be the priority,” Scheer said.“Canada has a significant amount of trade with Mexico and we believe that NAFTA has served Canada very well over the past two decades. So I think that it’s important that there is where the focus is.”If things change, however, the government’s focus might have to as well, he added. And he said he concurs with the government’s position rejecting a so-called “sunset clause” in NAFTA, saying deals with longevity are usually better.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau summarily rejected Wednesday the idea of one-on-one trade talks with the U.S., and last week he described drawing a line in the sand with the U.S. over the idea of a five-year sunset clause in NAFTA.But Scheer also made it clear Wednesday that the Conservatives are less than thrilled with how Trudeau has handled the negotiations.He said there’s more the prime minister could do to both manage the talks and protect Canadian workers, and he repeated his concerns about Canada’s retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods — a response to Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs — taking effect a full month after the American measures did.On NAFTA, he said the government’s insistence on making environmental issues and gender equality a priority at the negotiating table have helped to bog down the talks.Foreign affairs critic Erin O’Toole said Canada could generate some goodwill with Trump if it joins the U.S. missile defence system, an idea that was rejected in 2005 under the tenure of former Liberal prime minister Paul Martin.Last September, Trudeau opened the door to the possibility that could change. The government is now reviewing its options on missile defence, particularly in light of the new, modern nuclear threat that’s been taking shape on the Korean Peninsula.O’Toole floated the idea as a balm for the NAFTA talks in an opinion piece published Wednesday in the National Post.“Enhancing our (North American Aerospace Defence Command) relationship will remind the Americans that both our economic and security interests are integrated in such a way that you could not possibly view them as apart,” O’Toole wrote.Trudeau stressed Wednesday that there is House of Commons unity on the NAFTA file, even taking time in question period to thank the Conservatives and other parties for their support during the negotiations.“With this particular American administration, we have to be ready for everything.”Conservative commentator Goldy Hyder, president of Hill and Knowlton Strategies, said there’s no harm in the Conservatives taking a critical view of some foreign policy issues.“It reminds me of the expression, ‘Unity doesn’t require unanimity,’” Hyder said.“Conservatives can continue to be fully supportive of the government’s goal of securing a win-win-win NAFTA agreement without necessarily agreeing with each and every concession or counter-offer.”Hyder said Trump is going to “aggressively exploit” any angle he can find, but sometimes having political opposition at home can give negotiators the political cover they need to push back at the negotiating table, he added.last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA – Statistics Canada says manufacturing sales fell 0.4 per cent to $58.6 billion in August, due to a drop in motor vehicle sales.Economists had expected a drop of 0.6 per cent, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Sales were down in seven of 21 industries tracked, representing 50.9 per cent of the Canadian manufacturing sector.The motor vehicle industry saw sales fall 8.3 per cent to $4.9 billion in August, due to shutdowns in some assembly plants in August.Excluding the auto sector, overall manufacturing sales were up 0.4 per cent in August.The overall volume of sales in the manufacturing sector were down 0.3 per cent in August.last_img

first_imgPYONGYANG, Korea, Democratic People’s Republic Of — More than 20 years after his father almost bargained them away for a pair of nuclear reactors, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has his nuclear weapons — and a nation still plagued by chronic blackouts.Even on the clearest days, plumes of smoke from two towering chimneys linger over the centre of Pyongyang. The Soviet-era Pyongyang Combined Heat and Power Plant smokestacks are one of the North Korean capital’s most recognizable landmarks.Possibly more than anything else, this is Kim Jong Un’s Achilles heel as he turns his attention from developing the country’s nuclear weapons arsenal to building its economy.If stalled nuclear talks with Washington ever get back on track, helping Kim solve his country’s chronic energy deficit could be one of the biggest carrots President Trump has to offer. Washington, Seoul and Tokyo tried that back in the 1990s, and were even ready to pay for and build those two reactors Kim’s father wanted.Years of intensive sanctions have severely impacted North Korea’s supply of fossil fuels from the outside world, but they also have spurred the country to cobble together a smorgasbord of energy resources, some of them off the grid and some of them flat-out illegal.Here’s a look at where Kim stands and what he is doing to win his country’s real struggle for power.___THE BIG PICTUREAmong the most iconic images of North Korea are nighttime satellite photos that reveal it as an inky abyss ringed by the bright lights of China, South Korea and Japan.The whole nation of 25 million people uses about the same amount of electricity each year as Washington alone. It uses as much crude oil in a year as the U.S. consumes in just 12 hours. South Korea has about twice the population of the North, but its electricity consumption in 2014 was about 40 times bigger.Hydroelectricity, which is subject to seasonal swings, provides about half of the fuel supplied to the national energy grid. Coal accounts for the other half.The grid is leaky, archaic and badly needing repairs.That smoke-spewing power plant in the capital, which supplies much of the power and hot water needs for central Pyongyang, dates to the 1960s. Lights in the huge concrete apartment blocks of Tongil Boulevard across town stay lit thanks largely to the East Pyongyang Thermal Power Station — built by the Soviet Union in the 1980s.What electricity there is is unevenly distributed.The showcase capital and cities near coal or hydroelectric power plants get the best coverage. Military facilities also take precedence and often have their own supply. So do important party and government operations, some of the higher-profile residences and hotels in the capital and even some restaurants. Lights used to illuminate portraits of the leaders at night never go out.Still, it’s not uncommon for the power even in many higher status locations to flicker on and off. Dancing beams of flashlights are commonplace on the streets or in otherwise darkened apartments. In rural villages, even that often fades to black.___KEEPING THE OIL FLOWING …North Korea must import about 3 million to 4 million barrels of crude oil each year to sustain its economy.Most of it flows through one pipeline.The China-North Korea “Friendship Oil Pipeline” runs from the border city of Dandong under the Yalu River to a storage facility on the North Korean side about 13 kilometres (10 miles) outside the city of Sinuiju. From there, some is sent across country by truck or rail to the east coast, where it is stored at the port of Munchon. More is transported to Pyongyang for priority recipients such as the military, government departments and state enterprises, and to the port of Nampo, southwest of Pyongyang.The pipeline —technically there are two, one for crude and the other for refined products — was built between 1974 and 1976.North Korea used to have two refineries. The pipeline from China terminates at the Ponghwa Chemical Factory, which produces gasoline and diesel. The other refinery was built by the Soviet Union in the north near the Rason Special Economic Zone in the 1970s. It shut down in 1995 with the collapse of the Soviet empire. The pipeline that connected it with Siberia has long been out of use.Under U.N. sanctions imposed late last year, North Korea can import a maximum 500,000 barrels of refined oil products along with 4 million barrels of crude oil per year.Along with its Chinese connection, the North has been supplied by Russian tankers that ship oil and petroleum products to Munchon and another east coast port, Hungnam. It has found willing suppliers in the Middle East, or on the open market.Since the imposition of the import cap, Pyongyang has been implicated in increasingly sophisticated schemes to augment its supplies with hard-to-track transfers of oil by tankers at sea.Washington’s ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, told the Security Council in September the United States tracked at least 148 instances of oil tankers delivering refined petroleum products obtained through illegal ship-to-ship transfers in the first eight months of this year. She claimed the amount of illegally transferred oil — about 800,000 barrels — was 160 per cent of the annual 500,000 barrel cap.“In reality, we think they have obtained four times the annual quota in the first eight months of this year,” Haley said.___… AND GOING OFF THE GRIDDavid von Hippel and Peter Hayes of the Nautilus Institute have been following North Korea’s energy issue for years.Comparing Chinese trade figures from 2000 through 2017, they found explosive growth in North Korea’s imports of passenger cars and trucks that put an additional 107,000 vehicles on its roads. Tractor sales also rose and sales of “electricity propelled” bicycles or scooters, a category that wasn’t even listed until last year, doubled to 128,000.The truck and tractor sales almost certainly reflect an upgrade to the North’s transportation and agricultural sectors. Being able to get around is a key to doing business in a market-centric economy, and so is having enough spending power to buy things like electric scooters.Moreover, in a study released this month, Hayes and von Hippel also found that imports of diesel- and gasoline-powered generators, coupled with solar panels that are already ubiquitous in the North, are creating an energy system increasingly independent of the national power grid.“The data … reinforces a picture of a DPRK in which a more vibrant, modernizing, increasingly (at least functionally) market-based economy is providing households, business and institutions with the wherewithal to invest in both off-grid electricity supplies and increased transport services,” they wrote, using the acronym for the North’s official name.Still, keeping the power on often can be an elaborate routine.Solar panels, the cheapest option, can keep a room lit, a mobile phone working and maybe a TV or another appliance going. When electricity from the grid is actually flowing, it can be used to charge batteries before the next blackout hits.Those with a little more clout or money use diesel- or gas-powered generators that can power anything from a restaurant to an apartment block.Or a military installation.___Talmadge is the AP’s Pyongyang bureau chief. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter: @EricTalmadgeEric Talmadge, The Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgDALLAS — Union leaders say pilots will push American Airlines for more pay and schedule changes they say will reduce flight delays.Daniel Carey, president of the Allied Pilots Association, said that pilots will seek industry-leading wages when their current contract is due for renewal in January 2020.They’re working under a 2015 contract that granted immediate 23 per cent raises plus 3 per cent each year. In 2017, American gave pilots and flight attendants additional pay raises that totalled close to $1 billion and angered some investors.Carey also wants American to reduce its practice of shifting on-duty pilots to fill in for others who call in sick, can’t legally handle a flight because of crew-rest requirements, or other reasons.American has the worst 2018 on-time record of the four largest U.S. airlines.David Koenig, The Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgKATOWICE, Poland — Negotiators gathered for the U.N. climate talks in Poland are getting down to the nitty-gritty part of the two-week meeting.Diplomats from almost 200 countries began holding a series of technical talks Tuesday aimed at finalizing the rules that define the 2015 Paris accord on curbing global warming.Decisions on crunch issues are expected to be left to ministers when they return to the southern Polish city of Katowice next week.U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres made a dramatic appeal to governments Monday to confront the threat of unchecked climate change.Scientists say manmade emissions of greenhouses gases must be reduced to net zero by 2050 to stop catastrophic warming this century.____Read more stories on climate issues by The Associated Press at https://www.apnews.com/ClimateThe Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgTORONTO — Roots Corp. has lowered its sales and earnings estimates from targets set when the company went public in October 2017 after sales fell “well below” its own expectations in the third quarter.The clothing company’s total sales for the three months ended Nov. 3 were $87 million, down three per cent from $89.7 million last year when Roots benefited from Canada’s 150th anniversary celebrations.Net income was $2.8 million or seven cents per share, down from $5.0 million or 12 cent per share last year.Adjusted net income was $4.7 million or 11 cents per share, down from 23 cents per share in last year’s third quarter.Analysts had estimated $90.6 million of revenue and 16 cents per share of adjusted earnings, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Roots says its performance during the quarter reflected the absence of a large marketing campaign and unseasonably warm fall weather.The company is now estimating between $358 million and $375 million of sales in fiscal 2018, compared with the estimated range of $410 million to $450 million when Roots did its initial public offering.Roots is also revising its fiscal 2019 target range for adjusted EBITDA to between $46 million and $50 million, from between $61 million and $68 million, and it’s also revising its adjusted net income target range to between $20 million and $24 million from its previously stated target range of between $35 million and $40 million.Companies in this story: (TSX:ROOT)The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgTORONTO — An activist investor in Hudbay Minerals Inc. says it will push for a new slate of directors at the company’s next annual meeting after accusing the board of mismanagement.Waterton Global Resource Management Inc. says it is advocating for change at the mining company to address “massive value destruction and chronic underperformance”.The investment fund, holding about 10 per cent of Hudbay shares, says it pushed for dialogue with the company in October on potential changes to the board but was disappointed with the response.Waterton has also pushed to halt Hudbay’s plans, announced at the end of October, to acquire Mason Resources Corp. in a deal that valued the company at $31 million.The fund also requested a special meeting for an advisory resolution that Hudbay scheduled for February, but has withdrawn that request while announcing it would instead push for a new slate of directors.The push for new directors comes as hedge fund Paulson & Co. Inc. successfully led an overthrow of Detour Gold Corp.’s board of directors Thursday.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgTaylor mayor Rob Fraser and Chetwynd mayor Merlin Nichols at the opening of the Peace Island Park Pavilion. Photo by Chris NewtonTaylor mayor Rob Fraser gave some brief remarks at today’s ceremony, speaking about the hard work and dedication of those who have been involved in the pavilion’s construction.Chetwynd mayor Merlin Nichols also spoke about how the concept of the pavilion – which was initially imagined as more of a gazebo to be built by the playground near the park’s boat launch – had evolved over time, getting bigger with each year to become the rather large building with a wood fireplace it is now.He said that the pavilion’s evolution was similar to the evolution of Chetwynd’s annual chainsaw carving competition, which was fitting as Nichols and several other councillors were on hand for the unveiling of one of the community’s famous chainsaw carvings.Taylor mayor Rob Fraser and Chetwynd mayor Merlin Nichols unveiling the donated chainsaw carving at the opening of the Peace Island Park Pavilion. Photo by Chris NewtonFraser spoke about how Nichols had offered up one of Chetwynd’s carvings at around the same time the final concept of the pavilion was taking shape, and that the carving should be co-located with the pavilion and the as-yet built accessible playground, which is currently in the fundraising stage. TAYLOR, B.C. – Officials with the District of Taylor, the District of Chetwynd, the Fort St. John Petroleum Association, and the BC Peace Country River Rats were on hand today at Peace Island Park for the grand opening of the Park’s new Pavilion.Building the Pavilion has been the focus of both the River Rats and the Oilmen for the past several years, when the idea of building a permanent structure at the park along the Peace River was first imagined.The River Rats have hosted numerous fundraisers for the pavilion since 2016, including their annual Mother’s Day Dance. In August of that year, the Northern Development Initiative Trust awarded a $250,000 grant towards the pavilion’s construction. The carving, titled ‘Climbing Lessons,’ was carved in the 2006 competition by Prince George carver John Rogers.last_img read more

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Mental Health and Addiction Advisory Committee is sponsoring the ‘Walk for Mental Health’, today, Tuesday, May 7th, 2019.The walk takes place on the Northern Vac Track, located on the 3rd floor of the Pomeroy Sports Centre from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm.All donations being raised go towards the North Peace Mental Health Society. Donations are being accepted at the walk. For more information on the walk, call Cynthia; 250-793-0178last_img

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court on Friday asked the Election Commission of India secretary to appear before it on March 12 in connection with a PIL alleging that several categories of persons in Assam have been deprived of voting rights ahead of the Lok Sabha polls.The apex court sought the personal appearance of the secretary as despite the notice being issued on February 1 no one appeared to represent the Election Commission. The categories include some whose names figure in the draft NRC but not in the voters’ list. The matter came up before a bench comprising Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi and justices S A Nazeer and Sanjiv Khanna. The PIL alleged that a category of persons whose names were deleted from the voter list were some whose names appeared in the draft NRC published on July 30, 2018. The petition claimed these people had voted in the last Lok Sabha election held in 2014. The plea also submitted that there were people whose names were not included in the complete draft NRC, but they subsequently filed claims for inclusion of their names in it. They had voted in the earlier Lok Sabha elections and were waiting for inclusion of their names. The third category of people were those who have been declared as foreigners by the foreigners’ tribunal as well as by the Guwahati High Court but the court’s order was stayed by the Supreme Court. The petition said it is the category of the persons whose names were appearing in the voters list from time to time. The petition said the fourth category of people were those who had already been declared foreigners by the foreigners’ tribunal and such declarations were set aside by the apex court. However, their names have been deleted from the voters list pursuant to the order of the foreigners’ tribunal, the petition said. The petition said the fifth category of persons are those whose names have not been included in the draft NRC, but other members of their families, including parents, are included in the NRC and they have filed their claim for the inclusion of their names.last_img read more