Roosevelt Crips Gang Leader Convicted of Racketeering

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Roosevelt man and leader of a Crips street gang chapter was convicted Monday of federal racketeering charges for his involvement in three murders and other crimes over a decade-long span.A jury found Raphael “Gusto” Osborne guilty of conspiracy, robbery, attempted murder, witness retaliation, assault with a dangerous weapon, drug conspiracy and discharging firearms.“The crimes that Osborne stands convicted of underscore the wanton violence the Crips street gang unleashed on neighborhoods of Long Island,” said Robert Capers, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York. “We will continue to respond to the Crips’ brutal violence with unwavering investigation and prosecution.”Prosecutors said the 30-year-old gang member, who led the Roosevelt-based Rollin’ 60s Crips, orchestrated 15 shootings and three homicides as well as robberies, drug and gun trafficking between 2003 and 2013.He ordered his members to attack members of the rival Bloods street gang on sight and conspired to try and kill an informant, who was left paralyzed, authorities said.Osborne was responsible for bringing hundreds of illegal firearms to Long Island, including revolvers, semi-automatic handguns, assault rifles and submachine guns, according to investigators.He also conspired to distribute 280 grams of crack cocaine, 100 grams of heroin, 100 kilograms of marijuana and methylone, commonly known as “molly,” prosecutors said.Osborne faces between 115 years and life in prison when he’s sentenced.last_img read more

adminDecember 16, 2020bdknqLeave a Comment

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Reed: Perreca’s Bakery owners kept the light shining during Schenectady’s darkest years

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionAs you drive or walk around Schenectady these days, it’s impossible to miss all the signs of progress and rebirth.We have a new train station, a big new development on the Mohawk River waterfront and a bustling restaurant scene along lower Union Street. Lower State Street, long a blighted wasteland, is being transformed with two big multi-million-dollar mixed-use projects. Proctors is busier than ever. And we have some great craft breweries, both new ones and older. The list of exciting projects seems to go on and on.But it wasn’t always this way.Turn back the clock 25 or 35 years. Life in Schenectady was bleak.Back then, it was hard not to feel like the city was in a death spiral.Downtown was filled with empty storefronts, the streets strewn with litter. The city’s once-booming workforce was a shadow of its former self. The great American Locomotive Co. had long since ceased operations while General Electric was shedding jobs by the thousands in the 1980s and ’90s.In time, more and more smaller businesses called it quits, too. Venerable names like the Carl Co. and Wallace Armer Hardware vanished from the landscape. Others like Goldstock’s Sporting Goods pulled up stakes and moved to the suburbs. Communities benefit tremendously when the small mom-and-pop places are able to stay afloat in the lean times. They give customers a reason to keep coming back when the overall shopping options are few and far between compared with more vibrant commercial areas (the suburbs and Saratoga County, in Schenectady’s case).During my days behind the counter at Perreca’s, I served customers from all around Schenectady County and beyond. Many customers were regulars, folks who lived or worked in the city and stopped in daily. But many others made the trip into the city just to get their fix of Perreca’s bread or famous pizza. Perreca’s became its own form of “destination shopping.”Now that Schenectady’s fortunes are on the rebound, places like Perreca’s carry even more value in the community. They’re a direct link to the community’s forefathers, in Perreca’s case a nod to the contributions made to Schenectady by the many Italian immigrants all those years ago.So if you’d like to get a sense of the true Schenectady of yesteryear, swing by North Jay Street and pay a visit to Perreca’s.The coal-fired oven is original 1914 construction and the plain storefront — all about the bread — seems quaintly old-fashioned in this era of gleaming LED lights and polished metal. But it can serve as a blueprint for any city that seeks a sustainable future with a vibrant community of retailers and residents involved in each other’s lives.Miles Reed is the editor of The Daily Gazette. He can be reached by calling 518-395-3106 or emailing reed@dailygazette.com.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Fortunately, some businesses stuck it out. Places like Perreca’s Bakery, a landmark in the city’s once-thriving Little Italy neighborhood.Despite the city’s downturn and business closures all around, Perreca’s kept baking its fabulous Italian bread, just as it had been doing since 1914. Day after day, year after year, customers by the hundreds kept pulling up in their cars to pick up their daily bread.In the 1980s, when I was in my teens, I had the privilege of working at Perreca’s over four summers. I loved the job. It gave me an up-close glimpse into the workings of a true family business, one that treats its employees and customers, even the poorest ones, like family also.Businesses like Perreca’s are the lifeblood of a community like Schenectady, especially when the storm clouds of a downturn loom for decades, as they did here.Leaders like Ray Gillen, Philip Morris, Neil Golub, Roger Hull and others deserve high praise for helping to bring about the city’s revival in the past two decades.But so too do small-business owners like longtime Perreca’s matriarch and owner Lillian Perreca Papa, who died last week at the age of 93.Lillian and company saw to it that the bakery founded by her parents, Salvatore and Carmella Perecca, kept on going strong during the rough years for Schenectady. When other places were closing their doors or moving to greener pastures, they doubled down on Schenectady. As the years pressed on, Lillian positioned the bakery well for the future by passing on the reins to her children, Maria and Tony.last_img read more

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Mark of respect

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Norse sense

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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How the garden grows

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Nielsen Rd at Little Mulgrave has room for farm, cattle, kids

first_imgLot 1 Nielsen Road, Little MulgraveFOR 11 years, Russell Frost has lived in a tranquil oasis but still inside a respectable commute to Cairns City where he works.Lot 1 on Nielsen Rd at Little Mulgrave sits on 58ha at the end of Orchid Valley, straddling a creek and enough paddocks to run cattle or horses, and accommodate a cottage which rents at a premium through Airbnb. Lot 1 Nielsen Road, Little Mulgrave“I’m a local and I bought it for the privacy and peace and quiet, and to run some cattle,” Mr Frost said. “It is still not so far away that I can’t go to the city every day, though.“We’ve got swimming holes, you can go fishing out here. You can catch freshwater fish like sooty grunter. They’re good eating but we just release them.“You can camp and have all the animals you want out here – horses, cattle, dogs, whatever.”Mr Frost said the property and its five-bedroom, two-bathroom, two-car garage homes was “perfectly suited” for a family with kids, or someone who would like to grow crops.“There is enough space for kids with dirt bikes and ponies. It’s either that or someone can have a farm. We have got an irrigation licence so they can grow bananas and paw paws,” he said. More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms3 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns3 days agoLot 1 Nielsen Road, Little MulgraveWith a desire to travel the world, Mr Frost said he needed to free himself of assets, and believes the Airbnb property on the grounds was a great drawcard.“I’ve only just started doing it this year and I’ve got people coming Monday from Western Australia to escape the drought,” he said.“It’s really popular. They come here mainly because of the river and they don’t have to be in the city all the time.”Selling agent, Cairns Property Office’s Robyn Hawley-Whitton, said the property had enormous potential.“There is more than 2km of river frontage with a cantilevered deck overlooking pristine swimming holes and camping spots on a sandy beach,” she said.“The solid, large, rendered block home has massive living areas and renovated bathrooms, laundry and kitchen.” Lot 1 Nielsen Road, Little MulgraveThere are also two points of access to the property and an abundance of native wildlife, including platypus, can be sighted within the 40-minute drive to Cairns CBD and 10 minutes drive to shopping centres and schools.Little Mulgrave is also convenient to the Tablelands with tourists and visitors able to take the Gillies Range Rd up to the Far North’s spectacular and popular farming and agricultural locality. Lot 1 Nielsen Road, Little MulgraveThe kitchen has been installed with top-of-the-range appliances and a wall of pantries and granite bench tops and the sprawling main bedroom has a walk-in robe and a bathroom with a bespoke glass window overlooking the forest.The home is also airconditioned and has a security system and water tank.The separate cottage has been rented at $495 per night with some clients booking for two weeks at a time.last_img read more

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Gold Coast home is an entertainer’s dream

first_img24 Sun Valley Drive, Ashmore. 24 Sun Valley Drive, Ashmore. 24 Sun Valley Drive, Ashmore.IT’S the type of house that was designed to entertain guests.With a large outdoor pavilion and seven-person heated spa, you’ve got no other choice but to invite all your friends around to make good use of its features.The Ashmore property, which is on a 713sq m block, is owned by Narelle McBain.It hit the market earlier this month with the promise of offering a “homely” residence with lots of character. 24 Sun Valley Drive, Ashmore. 24 Sun Valley Drive, Ashmore.The heated spa is hidden in a second outdoor area for added privacy.The house has four bedrooms, one of which makes up part of an upstairs parents’ retreat with ensuite, walk-in wardrobe and balcony overlooking the park.It also has a rumpus room, study and double garage.The suburb is highly regarded for its shopping centres, sporting and medical facilities while also offering easy access to beaches, the Broadwater, cafes and restaurants as well as Brisbane and the Gold Coast Airport via the M1. 24 Sun Valley Drive, Ashmore.Marketing agent Darrell Johnson, of Knobel & Davis, said house hunters would be impressed with the modern home as soon as they stepped through the door.“(It has a) spacious and modern open-plan internal living (area) flowing effortlessly through to large and spellbinding outdoor entertaining spaces,” he said.The entertainment pavilion is one of its standout features.It has timber panelling and shutters as well as a kitchen with built-in barbecue, stone benchtops, a sink and bar fridge.Surrounded by lush gardens and overlooking Sun Valley Park, it is the perfect spot to wind down with friends and family. 24 Sun Valley Drive, Ashmore.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agolast_img read more

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Property fronting Tallebudgera Creek attracting plenty of interest

first_img MORE NEWS: Buyers flocking to Gold Coast beaches 113 Tallebudgera Drive, Palm Beach.“It’s a prime position on the creek,” she said.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa13 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“I’ve had worldwide interest from high net worth individuals phoning me about the property.”It is the first time it has hit the market since 1993.The five-bedroom house, which goes to auction on December 12, is on a 1010sq m parcel of land with 50m of creek frontage.“Gated and fully fenced for utmost privacy, this unique offering occupies a highly sought-after northwest point position in the heart of the southern Gold Coast’s social mecca of Palm Beach — a popular destination for water sports, boutique shopping and urban eateries,” the listing states. 113 Tallebudgera Drive, Palm Beach. 113 Tallebudgera Drive, Palm Beach. Plenty of people cool off at Tallebudgera Creek on a hot day. Picture: Adam HeadA PALM Beach creek front property is attracting interest from house hunters from as far away as Canada, Singapore, Abu Dhabi and New Zealand.Katrina Walsh of Harcourts Coastal said the Tallebudgera Drive property that fronted Tallebudgera Creek offered one of the best positions on the Gold Coast.Tallebudgera Creek is renowned for its calm and sparkling waters, with thousands flocking to the estuary each day. 113 Tallebudgera Drive, Palm Beach. 113 Tallebudgera Drive, Palm Beach. MORE NEWS: Thousands fall for tiny home scam The house features several casual and formal living zones as well as a pool, spa, waterfront terrace, balcony and deck.CoreLogic records reveal the owners paid just $230,000 for the property in 1993.Earlier this year the neighbouring property at No. 111 sold for $3.3 million.last_img read more

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Environmentalist wants government to increase turtle slaughter fine

first_img Tweet 9 Views   no discussions Share Share Sharecenter_img LocalNews Environmentalist wants government to increase turtle slaughter fine by: – June 24, 2011 Mr. Errol Harris. Photo credit: greenantilles.comEnvironmentalist Errol Harris is calling on the Roosevelt Skerrit administration to move ahead and increase the fine for the illegal slaughter of turtles.Harris who has been leading the cause to protect turtles nesting on Dominican beaches from being slaughtered says government should play their part.“I think last year government took the matter to Cabinet but so far it has not been gazetted. It is becoming a serious problem which needs to stop. There was a turtle turned over in Layou.”Harris said he is suppressed that Government have not dealt with the matter just yet.“I am surprised. I guess they have more important things to deal with than that,” he said.Dominica Vibes News Sharing is caring!last_img read more

adminSeptember 26, 2020bdknqLeave a Comment

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O’Connell hails Irish achievement

first_img “It just goes to show how good the athletes and the players we have are, and I think the way the provinces are run, and the way the strength and conditioning-wise we’re right up there too.” Ireland’s four-try victory over Scotland proved enough to secure glory again, Joe Schmidt’s side edging out Wales and England to mirror the feat of the 1949 team, led by Dr Jack Kyle. O’Connell set the tone with the game’s first try, eclipsing Fred Gardiner’s record as Ireland’s oldest try-scorer, a mark that had stood since March 1909. The Munster talisman led the charge as Sean O’Brien claimed a brace and Jared Payne also crossed, with Scotland unable to keep pace. England kicked off last, knowing a 26-point cushion in victory would secure the title – but France stubbornly refused to roll over and Stuart Lancaster’s men fell six points short of the required margin. O’Connell hailed England’s howitzer showing against France as “the performance of the championship”, conceding there was little enjoyment in watching that Twickenham clash on the TV. “That was probably the performance of the championship out of them to be honest,” said O’Connell of England’s vainglorious victory. “And that will give them a lot of confidence heading into the summer internationals and the World Cup, I thought they were incredible. “They threw caution to the wind, took a lot of quick taps and a lot of quick lineouts and I thought they were fearless. “France were unbelievable as well, scoring some great tries, it was a great effort for the Six Nations. “If only we all did so much to play every weekend, it’s already an unbelievable tournament but I think this weekend has been brilliant for it. “In the game when you’re playing in a match and you’re trying to win it like last season at the Stade de France, you’re just trying to focus on the next moment or whatever happens next. “The scoreline and all that is probably your only focus, and when you’re in the heat of battle, those nerves, those feelings don’t come into it. “When you’re sitting there at the table with a few of the lads with a beer in front of you watching on the TV, you’re like a supporter. “You’re completely powerless as to influencing the result, and it’s just such a bizarre day. “Even the crowd afterwards and the music during the trophy presentation – it was like Robbie Henshaw’s 21st birthday there, with the 80s hits coming out. “It was just an incredible day: it’s a lot better craic than last year anyway!” Victorious coach Schmidt hailed his Ireland side for shrugging off the disappointment of last weekend’s 23-16 defeat in Wales that blew a Grand Slam, to refocus and still swipe the title. “The two titles are special for different reasons,” said Schmidt. “This is special because of the way we had to rebound from last week. “It’s special because it’s been so long since we’ve put back-to-back Six Nations together.” Former Leinster and Clermont coach Schmidt admitted the end of the Six Nations would bring a dose of personal reality. Schmidt’s 11-year-old son Luke battled a brain tumour aged four and suffers from epilepsy. The Ireland boss and his wife will take their son for treatment overseas next week, with Schmidt happy to put rugby in its proper context. “Winning this tournament is a massive boost for us to be honest,” said Schmidt. “But the reality for me is that I’m on dad duty. “I’ve got a sick son and we’re off overseas to see specialists to try to get some help with him, so the reality for me is a long way from rugby when we fly out on Tuesday. “So I’ll park the rugby for a little while, and we’ll see if we can get really lucky on both sides of what’s important to us, and then we’ll look towards the World Cup towards the end of April. “There are 40,000 people with epilepsy in Ireland, so if I can help raise awareness of the condition, then hopefully that’s a positive.” The evergreen lock became Ireland’s oldest try-scorer of all time at 35 years and 152 days in Edinburgh, with his first Test score for nine years – then admitted that could have been his fairytale Six Nations swansong. Brian O’Driscoll bowed out in glory as Ireland saw off France 22-20 to claim the title in Paris last year, and O’Connell is seriously considering following suit. “It is a strange position, but I have to be sensible as well,” said O’Connell. “I genuinely haven’t given an answer because I don’t have an answer myself. “If it does finish, it’s a great way to finish. “Brian got it last year as well, but if it doesn’t finish, it’s a great achievement to have. “I think to go back-to-back in the Six Nations is incredible. “It’s a very, very difficult thing to do, particularly Ireland is a small island with four professional teams. Paul O’Connell labelled emulating Ireland’s great 1949 team by claiming back-to-back RBS 6 Nations titles as “incredible”. Ireland secured their third Six Nations title in six years by thumping Scotland 40-10 at Murrayfield, edging home on points-difference after England beat France 55-35. Ireland’s captain conceded he finds himself in “a strange position”, still unsure whether to retire from Test rugby after the autumn’s World Cup. Press Associationlast_img read more

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