Rugby Statistics: Does World Cup form matter?

first_img How much attention should be given to form going into a World Cup? Significance may well be attached to ‘building momentum’ in competitions such as the Rugby Championship beforehand, but winning that trophy is no guarantee of success later in the calendar year. Previous Tri-Nations / Rugby Championship victors in 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011 didn’t progress further than the semi-final stage at the World Cup that year.World Cup preparation does require a balancing act for coaches, with a need to welcome players back into the team environment after a domestic season, manage injuries and find the right mix between fitness and skills training. There is also a question of whether to give established combinations match time or rotate the squad and look at less experienced options.Below is a comparison between the previous four World Cup final winning XVs and the starting teams fielded in the preceding Tri-Nations / Rugby Championship or Six NationsAllowing for later injuries (such as Jean de Villiers), it can still be seen in 2007 that the South Africa sides picked in their final two Tri-Nations matches against Australia and New Zealand were very different to the team that later lifted the Webb Ellis Cup.  South Africa’s coach Jake White said at the time that it was “ludicrous to risk South Africa’s top players on an overseas tour in World Cup year” and the need to keep key players fresh was given priority over results.Winning run: England had won 35 of their 40 Tests leading up to the 2003 World Cup triumphIn contrast to New Zealand in 2011 (second in Rugby Championship), South Africa 2007 (third) and Australia in 1999 (second), England went into the 2003 World Cup campaign having already won a competition that year.  They won 35 of 40 Tests from the beginning of 2000 until the start of the 2003 tournament, with Six Nations titles in three of those four seasons. There was also English success in the Heineken Cup in this period with Northampton winning the trophy in 2000 and then Leicester in 2001 and 2002.England coach Sir Clive Woodward had a different approach to Jake White and opted to take a full strength team on a successful trip to New Zealand and Australia before the World Cup. A desire to generate “huge momentum” was provided as the reason in his book, Winning! Those victories in Wellington and Melbourne in June 2003 can be seen as important steps towards the later triumph, but it also true that losing both tour games in the Tri-Nations didn’t hurt New Zealand in 2011, South Africa in 2007 nor Australia in 1999. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Timed run: The All Blacks won the 2011 World Cup despite not winning the Tri-Nations that preceded it The above shows Test win rate per year, for the Rugby Championship and Six Nations teams from 1996-2015 and their World Cup finishing positions in that period.Taking a range of results from the start of the preceding season up until the final warm up match, Australia won 16 of 20 Tests before the 1999 tournament, England 17 of 19 before 2003 and New Zealand 16 of 19 before 2011.South Africa had a record of just 11 wins from 21 Tests from June 2006 until August 2007 and three victories in ten games against their main Southern Hemisphere rivals. However there was success at Super Rugby level. South African teams had a 55% win rate against New Zealand and Australian opponents in 2007, which has proved to be their highest rate in 20 seasons of the competition. The Bulls won the Super Rugby final that year and repeated that feat in 2009 and 2010. In total nine of the starters from the 2007 final between the Bulls and Sharks made began the World Cup Final, five months later.Come good: South Africa had been in fair-to-middling form in Tests, but their Super Rugby teams had been dominantMuch is made of French inconsistency but they have made at least the semi-final stage in each of the previous four World Cups. It should be noted that the Les Bleus did perform well the year before each of those tournaments – with Six Nations triumphs in 1998, 2002, 2006 and 2010 and achieving Grand Slams three times.However it is now France’s Pool D rivals Ireland with the superior Test form. Joe Schmidt’s side have won 13 of their previous 15 matches and the Six Nations in consecutive years.  There is an expectation that Ireland will reach at least the semi-final this year and with a potential route there of matches against Romania, Canada, Italy, France and likely Argentina, that optimism is understandable. New Zealand have been beaten just twice in 50 matches and could well take 11 starters from the 2011 final to the upcoming World Cup. They can call upon a front row combination of Tony Woodcock, Keven Mealamu and Owen Franks that have started 21 Tests together, a backrow trio of Jerome Kaino, Richie McCaw and Kieran Read that have 27 starts and a midfield pairing of Conrad Smith and Ma’a Nonu with 55 starts.Even with that experience and impressive winning record they will be aware that injuries, conditions, pressure and refereeing decisions all have the potential to act as levellers in elimination games. After all, the All Blacks went into the 2007 tournament having won 18 of the previous 20 matches, but were knocked out at the quarter-final stage. Meanwhile, an England team that had won only seven of 21 Tests pre-tournament and well beaten 36-0 by South Africa in the group stage, reached the final.last_img read more

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The French rugby club 4,300km from Paris

first_imgYou may never have heard of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, but there’s rugby there Saint Pierre and Miquelon is near 4,300km from Paris (edited from Google maps) The French rugby club 4,300km from ParisThe ‘playing field’ was doing well to be described as such. Strewn with stones and dotted with grazing horses, the patch in the Saint-Pierre commune needed a lot of work if it was to ever become match-ready.That was in 2007 and the would-be rugby stars on the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon had been inspired to start their own club after watching the Rugby World Cup in mainland France. Today, the small outfit has taken great strides.No matter what they do, though, they will always be a very long way from the headquarters of the Fédération Française de Rugby. Because the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon lie near the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, with their capital of Saint-Pierre some 4,300km from the outskirts of Paris.Under the sticks: SPM and Frederciton together (SPM XV Facebook)With a nod to a past of colonial expansion, the archipelago is the only chunk of the so-called ‘French North American Empire’ or ‘New France’  that is still tied to the mainland in Europe. Buoyed at the cusp of Canada, it is a small dash of France in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.“Our founding president was Joseph Serra, a rugby enthusiast who has passed away,” the incumbent president Morgan Drake tells Rugby World. “Jo had a lot of friends in the world of rugby – he was from the mainland and had played for the French military team. From the very first years of our club’s existence, he succeeded in making us travel to the south of France and to see the XV of France. We were at the Stade de France for the Grand Slam in 2010.Related: Top 14 2020-21 Season Preview“We have managed to work hard to make our land usable. We have built a mobile home which serves as a clubhouse. We have created a good relationship with the Fredericton Loyalists (from New Brunswick, Canada) with whom we play a game every year. We don’t have any competition and being the only club on the island, we train all year round for the match.“We have winter indoors because of the snow.”With the last census recording a population shy of 6000, the team have had to convince whoever they can to take an interest in the game. In the first few years the club was largely made up of citizens from mainland France. Gradually they made inroads into schools, took part in charity events, took on other sports clubs in the archipelago.Up in the air: A lineout contest (SPM XV Facebook)Soccer and ice hockey are popular in the territory. So the group have taken on running clubs and donned their skates under the SPM XV banner. As Drake proudly explains, the club even brandished an ‘erotic’ calendar one year.The last time SPM faced the Fredericton Loyalists, in 2019 – the third year in a row the clubs had met – they triumphed 49-28. The global Covid crisis has rendered a fixture in 2020 untenable, however Drake is hopeful they can plan for a June 2021 clash, with SPM likely to host. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img Related: Stade Français players found to have “lung lesions” due to Covid-19Recoiling from the pandemic, life in Saint-Pierre has mirrored that of the French mainland. Although the club president suggests there is no indication the virus is circulating their territory, the population have stuck to the rules, have masked-up and maintained a respectable distance from one another where possible.With eyes on a Fredericton rematch, Drake adds: “It will be necessary to follow the evolution of the virus and the geopolic decisions of opening up territories like Canada.”But what is it like being a member of the FFR, but being on the fringe of North America?“Our relationship with the FFR is complicated,” he begins. “Because we are far away and few in numbers… It’s politics.Politics: Former French PM Manuel Valls (far left) near Saint-Pierre, 2016 (Getty Images)“But since the election of Bernard Laporte as their president, we have manage to obtain the same endowments as (others around) the national levels. Goodies, jerseys, balls.“In the future we would like to maintain relations with Fredericton and why not meet other teams?”Related: The wild life of the Bouclier de Brennus Top 14 trophyBetween their youth, men’s and women’s players they boast around 50 members. Youngsters from 16 and up can come in and play, while the youth section covers kids from 5 to 15.It has taken time to build what SPM now have. They relish the spirit of touring and rarely get a chance to face outsiders. When they do it’s a celebration. They are proud of what they have achieved out there aside the coastal fishing grounds. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Video: Combating pneumonia, child mortality in Zambia

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Relief & Development, Health & Healthcare, Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Video Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release By Matthew DaviesPosted Apr 25, 2012 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Children, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Episcopal News Service] Pneumonia, or acute respiratory disease, is the second leading cause of mortality among children under five in Zambia. It’s a major health concern that Episcopal Relief & Development, in partnership with the Zambian Anglican Council and other stakeholders, is determined to combat through the implementation of a pneumococcal vaccination program later this year.The initial vaccination program will focus on Zambia’s Luapula Province, which borders the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the north.“It’s made up of some extraordinary communities that are very rural, very isolated, where people live along waterways, so it’s an extremely difficult place to work,” said Abagail Nelson, Episcopal Relief & Development’s senior vice president for programs. “But it’s a place where we’re pleased to work and a place where the church has a lot of community-based networks and the capacity to bring the vaccine to children.”According to the World Health Organization, pneumococcal disease is responsible for the deaths of more than 1.5 million people worldwide every year, including more than half a million children before their fifth birthday.The pneumococcal vaccine has been available in the U.S. since the early 1900s and has been recommended since 2000 for all children aged 2 to 23 months. But only very recently has the vaccine been available in the developing world.Zambia is planning to introduce the vaccine into its health system this year, but the ministry of health relies on organizations such as the Zambian Anglican Council and Episcopal Relief & Development to ensure that treatment reaches the children who need it most.“It’s a little known fact that acute respiratory infection kills more children than AIDS. If you address diarrheal-related diseases, pneumonia-related diseases and malaria, you’re really getting at the three leading killers of children under five, particularly in contexts like Luapula,” said Nelson.The program in Luapula has the potential of reaching 250,000 children whose lives are at risk from contracting pneumonia as well as other diseases. “We’re looking at what’s called an integrated child health program … that also helps increase nutrition and reduce deaths from diseases such as malaria,” said Nelson. “If we can address these illnesses, of course, children will live, they will thrive, and they will contribute to the greater health and community life of their country.”Episcopal Relief & Development has worked in partnership with ZAC — the body that represents all five dioceses and health and training institutions for the Anglican Church in Zambia — in combating malaria through the NetsforLife® program, an Episcopal Relief & Development program partnership that has won awards and earned widespread respect for saving millions of lives in Africa.The pilot project was launched in Zambia in 2005, and a decrease in malaria cases of more than 50 percent has been reported in some areas.Due to previous success with its malaria prevention initiatives in Zambia and an earlier food security program that began in 2000, the ZAC and Episcopal Relief & Development partnership is a “model for the rest of Africa,” Stephen Dsizi, technical director for NetsforLife®, told ENS during a three-day training program in July 2011 in Lusaka, Zambia.The training program brought together international and local experts in health issues and representatives from relief and development organizations to prepare Zambian Anglicans for the pneumonia immunization program.Nelson told ENS that the Zambian Anglican Council has a “fantastic reputation with the ministry of health and other ministries. We’re privileged to be able to support them as they continue to reach out in the communities and be a strong presence for people in need.”The Zambia Anglican Council, under the directorship of Grace Phiri and in partnership with Episcopal Relief & Development, “has shown how to develop and implement projects that are a demonstration for the globe,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, who participated in a portion of the July 2011 training in Lusaka, told ENS at the time. “It’s remarkable work that is integrated and holistic and serving the whole community.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Communion, Video: Combating pneumonia, child mortality in Zambia Episcopal Relief & Development builds on success of malaria prevention Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

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AIDS conference draws global religious activists to DC

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (1) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 21, 2012 at 12:26 pm Here is a video of the Quilt the last time it was on the National Mall on October 12, 1996: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQHX3wA4Fqw Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH John Z Wetmore says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN By Lucy ChumbleyPosted Jul 20, 2012 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img AIDS conference draws global religious activists to DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT HIV/AIDS Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal News Service] Faith in the face of discrimination and disease can be difficult, but for more than 750 activists who have arrived in Washington, D.C., ahead of the July 22-27 International AIDS Conference to take part in an interfaith pre-conference, it is also indispensable.Joining the main event, Turning the Tide Together, which will draw more than 20,000 participants from around the globe, and the two-day pre-conference, Faith & AIDS 2012: Taking Action Together, which kicks off July 20 at Howard University, are 26 witnesses from the 76 countries where being LGBT is illegal.The witnesses, who each have a faith connection, were brought to Washington by “The Spirit of 76,” a program of the St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation and the COMPASS Coalition, nonprofits working to end the criminalization of LGBT citizens and to foster dialogue and reconciliation.They have traveled from as far afield as Singapore and Uganda to share their personal stories and to build partnerships to enable greater engagement and collaboration in the area of faith and rights.They will take part in plenary sessions, skill-building workshops and daily worship under the theme of health, dignity and justice at the Interfaith Pre-Conference on HIV, before joining the 19th AIDS Conference to hear from HIV experts from a variety of disciplines and learn of the latest advances in HIV science and the most important policy and programmatic issues. They’ll also hear from a wide range of world leaders and celebrities, including former U.S. President Bill Clinton, Microsoft Founder and Chairman Bill Gates and Singer/Songwriter Elton John.Gathering formally for the first time on July 18 at the First Congregational United Church of Christ in downtown D.C. after a day of sightseeing in 98-degree heat, the group dined together and received a warm welcome from the organizers and from Daniel Baer, deputy assistant secretary of state, who greeted them on behalf of President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.Most had arrived on July 17 and spent their first two nights with hosts from local congregations, among those six Episcopal churches in the Diocese of Washington. (Local coordinator Eric Scharf, of St. Thomas’ Episcopal, D.C., worked with the parishes to find hosts). They will stay at Howard University for the duration of the two conferences, returning to their hosts for the last two nights, when they also will share their stories in their hosts’ congregations.Maxensia N. Takirambule, executive director of the Lungujja Community Health Caring Organization, the Rev. Canon Albert J. Ogle, president of the St. Paul’s Foundation, Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, the retired former bishop of West Buganda, Uganda, and Daniel Baer, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State. ENS photo/Lucy Chumbley“Often when there’s problems in countries with access to HIV/AIDS medication and treatment, the faith community is in the front seat driving [activism],” said the Rev. Canon Albert J. Ogle, president of the St. Paul’s Foundation and a priest of St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, San Diego.Baer said one of the questions he’s asked most frequently is how to engage faith communities. “It is the thing everybody seems to identify as the locus of important conversations,” he said.Commending Obama for lifting the 22-year ban on travel to the United States by people who had tested positive for the virus that causes AIDS — as did Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Presiding Bishop Mark Hanson of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in a joint statement on the AIDS Conference released July 20 — Baer said it was essential to have these conversations in person.“In the age of Facebook and Twitter, we can forget how important it is to come together, face to face,” he said. “It’s important not just to exchange information, but to remind each other that we’re not here alone.”He described the challenge of HIV/AIDS as “the door you can gently open to how to protect issues of human rights of LGBT people,” adding that “you can’t really solve practical problems without protecting human rights.”Baer said he had learned from retired Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, a gay rights activist from Uganda who was named by the Huffington Post as one of the 10 most influential religious leaders in 2010, that compassion is a two-way street.“If we don’t acknowledge that the step for many people is uncomfortable, difficult – something they’ve fought for so long – then we won’t get to the second or third conversation,” he said.Introduced by Ogle as “one of the great spiritual leaders of the movement,” Senyonjo, former bishop of West Buganda, spoke of the need for religious leaders to refocus on the message of love.“Instead of preaching good news, we are preaching hate,” he said. “Instead of preaching love we are preaching about people going to hell… We have to change our preaching: God has created you and God loves you in spite of your sexuality. This is good news, and people need to hear it.”Religious convictions aside, Senyonjo pointed out that on a purely practical note, if marginalized people are unable to seek treatment, the AIDS pandemic will become worse.“It is worse to allow genocide to take place,” he said.Human rights activist Maxensia N. Takirambule, the Roman Catholic executive director of the Lungujja Community Health Caring Organization in Uganda, said without the support of advocates like Senyonjo, she would not be able to do the work she is doing.Takirambule has been HIV positive for the last 16 years and in 1999 lost her husband to the disease.“If I could not get treatment, if I could not find people like Bishop Senyonjo to talk to me… would I be here?” she said. “I had no hope for life. If I had not been empowered enough to do this advocacy, I would not be here.”Takirambule stressed the need to build strong and enduring partnerships during the conference. “We need a strong advocacy team, because for us in Africa, individually, it is not very easy for us to speak up. But when we form a group…”During their time in Washington, The Spirit of 76 witnesses will take part in a July 25 advocacy day, said Sandy Sorensen, director of the UCC’s Washington, D.C., office of justice and witness ministries. The group will gather at the Lutheran Church of the Reformation on Capitol Hill for a briefing before forming about 13 teams of three (two international religious leaders and one U.S. accompanier) to meet with government representatives.“Unless you bring things to the forefront with a visit and a story, these issues can get pushed to the side,” Sorensen said. “It really makes a difference to have real live engagement with people and their stories.”In addition to these in-person meetings, both the UCC network and the Episcopal Public Policy Network will send out action alerts to gather support for these issues from the wider church.“We have a very clear mandate to care for the sick and the most vulnerable, and the AIDS pandemic is a very clear manifestation of that in our time,” said Sarah Dreier, the legislative representative for international issues for both the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.Dreier described the joint statement released July 20 by Jefferts Schori and Hanson as a “proactive and staunch stance on where these churches stand,” and encouraged members of both denominations to advocate for the allocation of robust funding to make treatment more effective and widespread and to contribute to the de-stigmatization of the disease.To learn more about how to take action, visit the Episcopal Public Policy Network.Related events:• At 7 p.m. July 21, Washington National Cathedral will host “From Darkness to Light: An Interfaith Service of Hope and Commitment” honoring those who have died and those who continue to struggle to live with dignity and worth in the face of HIV/AIDS. Dr. James Curran will speak at the service, which will be webcast live from the cathedral’s homepage.• Marking the 25th anniversary of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, the NAMES Project Foundation is overseeing Quilt in the Capital, the display of portions of the quilt at locations around the city. To date, the quilt memorializes more than 94,000 individuals on more than 47,000 panels. Notable panels, blessed on July 18 by Bishop Jane Holmes Dixon, will be on display at Washington National Cathedral through July 24.— Lucy Chumbley is a freelance journalist based in Washington, D.C. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Health & Healthcare, Rector Knoxville, TN Tags An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

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Video & Feature – Iona: A Celtic Pilgrimage

first_imgVideo & Feature – Iona: A Celtic Pilgrimage Celtic Christianity celebrates 1,450th anniversary of Columba’s Iona May 8, 2013 at 8:28 pm This video just strengthen my desire to go to Iona. I have been interested in Celtic Christianity for many years. Our parish uses many pieces of music from the Community and several parishioners have been to Iona on pilgrimage. Rector Belleville, IL Ecumenical & Interreligious, Nancy Brantingham says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Paul Rider says: Ann Fontaine says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service May 6, 2013 at 12:25 pm The boat skipper who took us to Fingal’s Cave on Staffa told us Columba made all the women residents of Iona move to a nearby island so his monks would not have to look at them. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Jo Ann Ford says: May 6, 2013 at 4:24 pm I’m making my fourth trip to Iona this summer, staying at Bishop’s House for the third time. Thrilled to be the chaplain there for the week. What a wonderful, holy place is this Island! Of you go, be sure to go on the pilgrimage with the Iona Community. They occur each week and the community welcomes pilgrims from all over. Just be sure to bring good boots and waterproofs…. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] The ancient Celts described Iona as a “thin place,” where the veil between heaven and earth is lifted, and where one might glimpse the divine.For centuries pilgrims have traveled to this small island off the West coast of Scotland, leaving behind their chaotic lives to rest, reflect and walk in the footsteps of St. Columba, the Irish missionary who founded a monastery on Iona in 563 AD.Columba was forced into exile allegedly following a dispute concerning the ownership of a psalter he’d copied in his home county of Donegal. His subsequent missionary work is credited with the spread of Christianity throughout the British Isles.May 2013 marks the 1,450th anniversary of Columba’s arrival on Iona. His feast day is celebrated on June 9 throughout the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion.The Rev. Nancy Brantingham, a priest from the Episcopal Diocese of Minnesota and a long-time student of Celtic Christianity, visited Iona for the first time in October 2012.“Columba had a role here, situated at the monastery with his monks, teaching them and then sending them out two by two, and look what happened,” said Brantingham, who was leading a group of pilgrims mainly from her home diocese. “Was the world ready to hear from him, and are they ready to hear from us yet, I don’t know. But numbers certainly aren’t the only thing that matter when it comes to getting the word out … touching people’s hearts.”Group members began the week discussing why they’d taken this two-day journey over land, air and sea to the island and if they’d brought any questions with them.For Brantingham, Columba “is a great patron because he loved writing, had gifts for teaching, loved to study, was a good pastor. I hope I am, too. So I think that’s why I came.”The Rev. JoAnn Ford said she had come with many questions about who she was as a retired parish priest “and where do I go from here, what do I do?”But she arrived “being open,” she said. “Not with any need to find an answer.”“How do I know what is God’s will?” asked Maren Mahowald. “How do I recognize it? How do I know if I’m responding? That’s why I’m here.”Although the pilgrims had brought many personal questions, they also acknowledged the importance of community along such a journey.Athene Westergaard noted that, “when traveling in a community that you trust, it’s the community that supports you, which is what the faith is all about. The faith is not a lonely experience.”Bishop Kevin Pearson of the Scottish Episcopal Church’s Diocese of Argyll & the Isles, under whose jurisdiction Iona falls, also visited the island in October and joined the Minnesota group for part of its pilgrimage.A pilgrimage “helps you journey within,” Pearson told ENS while walking with other pilgrims around the island. “[It] brings together the spiritual, interior world and a world that’s hard-and-fast. So the actual physical exercise is a part of the spiritual exercise as well, and you’re drawn into God’s life almost whether you want to go or not.”The Scottish Episcopal Church’s St. Columba’s Chapel and the adjacent Bishop’s House have served as a place of prayer and study for pilgrims to Iona since 1894.“People are increasingly drawn to journeying and to making pilgrimages, whether they call them pilgrimages or not, to holy places, to places that for centuries have meant a lot to people,” Pearson said. “And, basically, they’re journeying within themselves; they’re searching for God.”One of the highlights of visiting Iona is connecting with the Iona Community, an ecumenical group formed in 1938. Under the leadership of its founder George MacLeod, the community set out to rebuild parts of the medieval Iona Abbey.Today, the community has a strong commitment to peace and justice issues and offers weekly pilgrimages around the island, stopping at places of historical or spiritual significance and reflecting on the journey along the way.Rebuilding the abbey “was to be a symbol of the need for the church to re-engage with ordinary folk and a concern for the need to rebuild community,” the Rev. Peter MacDonald, (Presbyterian) Church of Scotland priest and leader of the Iona Community, told ENS during an interview inside the abbey.Julie Hooper, one of the Minnesota pilgrims, has visited Iona four times. She keeps returning, she said, because “there is something that settles the soul here.“It’s very peaceful and nurturing, and I don’t think it matters what your religious or spiritual inclination is. I think there are a lot of people who come here who aren’t necessarily Christian, but they come because they feel that nurturing and peacefulness here.”Making her first visit to Iona, Dorothy Ramsdell of the Episcopal Diocese of Nevada said that she felt an energy making it “possible to just be loving. It is truly a model of living together with the land in community.”The pilgrims found peace and tranquility everywhere on Iona: in the organic gardens that feed the travelers, in the nature and the wildlife, in the ancient stones and monuments, and in the memories of those who’ve gone before. But mostly, they observed how that peace is found in the community that is formed during any visit or pilgrimage to the island. It’s a reminder of how Columba lived in community with his fellow monks who helped to evangelize the British Isles and engrave on it the legacy of Celtic Christianity.Reflecting on Columba’s influence, MacDonald said: “It could be argued that the Columban mission to Scotland and further afield actually helped form Scotland as a nation state. Columba was often engaging with the chiefs of various tribes and peoples around here, and their reasons for inviting the Columban monks to go there was as much political as spiritual. So I think we see that integration, that wholeness, of Columba and the Celts as something that we try to live out today.”“The ancients knew about the value of pilgrimage as a metaphor for life’s journey, and I think people today recognize that as a spiritual discipline,” said MacDonald.For many pilgrims new beginnings and possibilities open up after visiting Iona.“You never get to go home from pilgrimage empty-handed,” Brantingham told ENS. “One of the beautiful things about pilgrimage is that you go as a solitary traveler, but then the community begins to form around the experience of being vulnerable, of being afraid, of having questions about where God is right now in our lives, how God is at work and what’s next.“In some sense, the pilgrimage never really ends,” she added. “To be sure, we will go our separate ways, but we are also bound now to one another forever by the stories, experiences, and memories we shared; by the awareness that however far we are from one another in the physical world, we are, nonetheless, still together on the journey that leads to knowing and loving God more deeply. And everything about the experience, from the first awareness of being called to make the trip to the homecoming at journey’s end, holds potential insight and wisdom we can draw on for the rest of our lives.”— Matthew Davies is an Episcopal News Service editor and reporter. dee renner says: May 6, 2013 at 4:41 pm The Iona Community is a great place to volunteer. Hard work but great people and environment. I spent three months there two years ago. If you’re looking for a place to be in transition, consider this spot. CAROLINE ROPER-DEYO says: May 6, 2013 at 4:10 pm And while Iona is indeed one of those ‘thin places,’ it’s where I learned that there is never bad weather only wrong clothing. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel May 16, 2013 at 9:53 am We did have a lovely, lovely experience. I would go back in a heartbeat. Zam, how wonderful to see you “here” (online)! You and others in the Iona Community were so much a part of the blessing we experienced on Iona. To those of you about to make the trip, blessings and peace. You’ll be in my prayers. Joseph Lane says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY May 8, 2013 at 12:55 am The video was wonderful. Thank you Matt. I hope to go one day. Although I’ve never been there it feels like home. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 9, 2013 at 4:07 pm I’ve been there three times. Scotland is the land of my heritage. Iona is the soul of Scotland. It is a place where the creative “wind (Spirit) of God” blows. Last time I was there the wind just about literally blew me off of Dun I , the highest point of Iona. I planted a rock from my island (San Juan Island) in the cairn and took a wee rock from Iona, which I carry in my pocket as a talisman. But, then, all of creation is a magical talisman according to the Celts. Iona is truly a “thin place”…if one lets it be. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Zam Walker says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC May 7, 2013 at 11:25 am I took a group of J2A teens in 2011 to Iona. We stayed in the Hostel at the end of the island. It was one of the best pilgrimages that I have taken. On our way to Iona we stayed in Oban for a few nights. Bishop Kevin was the preacher at the cathedral that Sunday. He was absolutely lovely and really connected with the teens. By Matthew DaviesPosted May 6, 2013 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab May 7, 2013 at 1:10 am Thank you so much for this. I’m going to Iona in just over a week! June 12, 2013 at 7:28 pm BJ, Couldn’t have said it better myself, as I was with you and sharing the experience. dee An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 6, 2013 at 4:44 pm I’ve visited Iona twice and hope to go again, to walk the hills to Columba’s Bay, to sit in silence and solitude inside both the abbey and the other chapels, to watch the moon ride the Sound as it rises over Mull, and to dance and laugh with friends old and new at the ceilidh and over superb food and drink. It’s a magical, holy, truly thin place that calls one back and back. I can’t get enough, and I long to return. As before, I will plan to stay no less than three nights–it’s essential to abide. June 4, 2015 at 2:21 pm I realize that personal info is not shared on this site, however, am planning a pilgrimage group to Iona in 2016 and would appreciate not having to reinvent the wheel. How does one go about booking the extra stuff – I have accommodations on Iona, but not sure of where to land and spend the extra nights. How was your tour structured? Comments are closed. Featured Events Loraine Tuenge says: July 22, 2014 at 6:36 pm My partner and I found ourselves on Iona in 1999 while traveling around Scotland. We missed the last ferry of the night and got “stuck” on the island with little money. We decided to sleep under the stars in the Nunnery ruins. A kind person at the pub told us that if we got cold, the Abbey is always open and we could sleep there, which is what we did halfway through the night. I will never forget waking up to sunlight streaming through the windows and music playing for the morning service! 5 years later, we returned and were married by a kind Presbyterian Pastor, Syd Graham, in the Nunnery. It wasn’t a legal marriage (we did that back at home), but it was an unforgettable ceremony of spiritual love and beauty. We will surely be back one day with our two kids, one of whom bears the name of “Iona” as her middle name. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Elizabeth Darlington says: Comments (18) center_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Donna Hicks says: Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs May 29, 2013 at 9:48 am I just led a group of pilgrims to Iona, Skye and Lewis a couple of weeks ago. We had 4 nights at Bishop’s House, and LOVE their renovations. It was a completely wonderful time, holy and peaceful. We were fortunate enough to be able to take that Tuesday pilgrimage around the island with J. Philip Newell and Ali as the leaders, and hear them at the Abbey. It was my 9th time on the island, and by far the very best experience… even though the weather was cold and wet. The hospitality was warm and inviting. As wonderful as the Abbey is, there is nothing like sharing the Eucharist in the awesome chapel at Bishop’s House. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Mollie Douglas Turner says: Rector Albany, NY Anglican Communion, dee renner says: Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Richard W. Wright says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing May 6, 2013 at 4:26 pm Matt truly captures the essence of Iona and of pilgrimage with this video. Thanks Matt. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Kzren I Ford says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Sister BJ Brown says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT June 12, 2013 at 7:27 pm Carolyn, I was there on my birthday, May 6 2013, for he fourth time. I also can’t wait to return. Do go when you can. deacon dee renner Rector Collierville, TN M. Sue Reid says: Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missy Roetter says: May 10, 2013 at 1:36 pm The banning of women is one of the myths that some love to tell. However archaeological evidence shows that there were nuns who lived on the island at the same time. Also in Adomnan’s ‘Life of Columba’ written only 100 years after the death of Columba, there are stories of Columba’s concern for men and women in various forms (including relief of pain in childbirth and for a couple to have a good sex-life….)(BTW there are no vines on the 1200 year old St Martin’s cross – they are snakes!)It was lovely to see this film. I am the one in the cyclamen pink waterproof jacket and I was the back-marker on the pilgrimage, co-leading it with Becki. It was certainly a privilege to meet with the group from the US and share the week. I was on Iona this week and we had much better weather last October.. however, it was still very nice to be on the island!Every blessing from the west of Scotland Video Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

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La iglesia episcopal de The Falls celebra el pasado y…

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC La iglesia episcopal de The Falls planea reunirse en su histórico edificio el 15 de mayo para instalar un nuevo rector y rendirle tributo a sus miembros y ministros del pasado, el presente y el futuro. Foto de la iglesia episcopal de The Falls.[Episcopal News Service] Cuando los miembros de la iglesia episcopal de The Falls [The Falls Church Episcopal] instalen nuevamente su nuevo rector y celebren juntos su nuevo ministerio el 15 de mayo, habrá pasado más de un año desde que regresaron por primera vez a su histórico edificio, nueve meses desde que su rector se les unió y cinco días antes de lo que habían esperado que sería la última fecha en la disputa de casi siete años por la propiedad de la parroquia.“Será una noche en la que daremos gracias por el pasado y expresaremos nuestro entusiasmo por el presente y el futuro y por las grandes cosas que Dios está haciendo aquí”, dijo el Rdo. John Ohmer, rector de la iglesia de The Falls, en una entrevista.Shannon Johnston, obispo de la Diócesis de Virginia, quien presidirá el oficio, dijo a Episcopal News Service que la celebración y la renovación de los ministerios “tiene un tremendo significado” para la congregación.“Luego de regresar a su hogar parroquial hace un año, los miembros y el liderazgo de esta congregación han invertido una enorme cantidad de energía en su misión y ministerio como congregación. En este servicio, nos reuniremos para celebrar esa renovación y el compromiso con un futuro muy prometedor”, dijo él. “Que podamos hacerlo en este histórico escenario, hogar de tantas generaciones de episcopales, es lo más adecuado”.El Rdo. John Ohmer —que aparece aquí con suministros destinados a un ministerio para personas sin hogar— dice que se sintió llamado a unirse a la congregación porque “[ésta] tenía una visión convincente de lo que la Iglesia Episcopal podría volver a hacer en la iglesia de The Falls”. Foto de la iglesia episcopal de The Falls.Johnston dijo que Ohmer “aporta una visión y un espíritu excepcionales” a la iglesia de The Falls. Ohmer, la Rda. Cathy Tibbetts, la vicaria, y el liderazgo laico de la congregación “participan de un empeño común para garantizar que la iglesia de The Falls siga creciendo y prosperando en su servicio a Cristo”, añadió.La iglesia episcopal de The Falls ha estado proyectándose hacia el futuro desde que los miembros de esta histórica parroquia suburbana de Washington, D.C. decidieran por abrumadora mayoría, en diciembre de 2006, abandonar la Diócesis de Virginia y la Iglesia Episcopal en medio de una disputa teológica. Los que decidieron irse de hecho se quedaron en la propiedad de la iglesia de The Falls y rehusaron devolverla a la diócesis.Sólo 27 de cerca de 2.800 miembros siguieron vinculados a la Iglesia Episcopal después de la votación. Este grupo comenzó a reunirse en la sala de una casa y eligió una junta parroquial. Peter Lee, a la sazón el obispo de Virginia, le asignó un clérigo al grupo y poco después la Iglesia Presbiteriana de Falls Church[*] que se levanta en la acera de enfrente de la iglesia episcopal, les ofreció un espacio para adorar en el ático de su salón. El grupo no tardó en desbordar ese ático y tuvo que mudarse dos veces a espacios más amplios dentro de la iglesia presbiteriana.“Los presbiterianos estaban absolutamente asombrados”, dijo Matt Rhodes, uno de los feligreses. “Todavía seguimos participando del mismo ministerio compartido que ellos llevan a cabo con los desamparados”.La asistencia dominical aumentó rápidamente hasta alcanzar un promedio de entre 80 y 100, y desde el comienzo, dice Ohmer, los episcopales “tuvieron realmente una visión convincente de lo que la Iglesia Episcopal podría llegar a ser de nuevo en Falls Church”.Añadió que él dudaba que cualquiera de ellos hubiera esperado pasar cerca de siete años en una disputa legal por la propiedad de la iglesia, que finalmente se ventiló en el Tribunal Supremo del Estado [de Virginia]. La iglesia de The Falls fue una de las 11 congregaciones de la diócesis en que una mayoría de los miembros votó a favor de desafiliarse de la diócesis y de la Iglesia Episcopal. En el curso de los años, todas las iglesias, con excepción de la Iglesia Anglicana de The Falls, arreglaron sus conflictos de propiedad con la diócesis y con la Iglesia luego de veredictos judiciales a favor de estas entidades [la diócesis y la Iglesia Episcopal].Luego de que un juez del circuito judicial del Condado de Fairfax le ordenara a la Iglesia Anglicana de The Falls en marzo de 2012 que devolviera la propiedad parroquial a la diócesis, los anglicanos sólo convinieron en dejar que los episcopales regresaran al edificio parroquial para celebrar la Pascua (el 8 de abril de 2012).Sin embargo, la congregación anglicana poco después apeló al Tribunal Supremo del Estado y en el ínterin le pidió al Tribunal de Circuito que impidiera el regreso de los episcopales hasta que el tribunal supremo se pronunciara. El Tribunal de Circuito rehusó esta petición y los episcopales de la iglesia de The Falls regresaron a su propiedad el 15 de mayo de 2012.El 18 de abril de este año, el Tribunal Supremo de Virginia ratificó el veredicto del tribunal de circuito de devolver la propiedad de la iglesia de The Falls a los episcopales.El Rdo. John Yates, rector de la Iglesia Anglicana de The Falls, le dijo a su congregación el 28 de abril que el veredicto del Tribunal Supremo constituía “un apabullante rechazo de nuestros argumentos” y “reduce drásticamente nuestras opciones legales”.“A menos que podamos percibir que existen medios ulteriores de apelación que tengan buen juicio, podemos decir que resulta claro que no regresaremos a nuestra antigua propiedad” ni recuperaremos algo de los fondos que son parte de la disputa, escribió él.Y en su mensaje semanal correspondiente a la semana del 19 de mayo, que se puede consultar en la página web de la congregación anglicana desde el 15 de mayo, Yates dice: “Hemos recibido ulterior confirmación de que no es probable que los tribunales revoquen su dictamen del año pasado”. Él explicó por qué los líderes de la congregación “están dispuestos a perder nuestra propiedad y avanzar hacia un futuro incierto y difuso”.No obstante, La Iglesia Anglicana de The Falls tiene hasta el 20 de mayo para solicitar del Tribunal Supremo [del Estado de Virginia] una nueva vista sobre su veredicto, y una carta de los dos guardianes y de la junta parroquial de la congregación, fechada el 10 de mayo, indica que la iglesia le pedirá al tribunal que reconsidere su dictamen. Los abogados de la congregación anglicana le dijeron a la junta parroquial que el Tribunal Supremo basó su decisión “en un argumento que, en siete años de procedimientos judiciales, nunca había sido presentado por la otra parte” y que ellos no habían sido capaces de abordar, según dice la carta. Por consiguiente, la junta parroquial anunció que “presentará una breve petición al tribunal [para una nueva vista] dentro de unos días” mientras sigue en su búsqueda de un hogar permanente.“Era nuestra esperanza, desde luego, que ellos hubieran decidido que era hora de cerrar este largo capítulo legal y que concentraran todas sus finanzas y energías, y que nos permitieran a nosotros concentrar todas nuestras energías, en nuestros [respectivos] ministerios”, dijo Ohmer a ENS.Ohmer agregó que una de sus frustraciones es ver como el largo proceso legal “ha convencido falsamente” a algunas personas de que los anglicanos y los episcopales se proponen mantenerse en guardia unos contra otros”, cuando de hecho lo que deberíamos todos es aglutinar nuestras energías para combatir el enemigo común que ambos compartimos: el del feroz consumismo de nuestra cultura y un sentimiento generalizado de desorientación, desesperanza, soledad y falta de propósito”.“Esos son algunos de los enemigos comunes que ambas ‘partes’ tenemos”, afirmó, “para los cuales el Evangelio es una alternativa, y yo anhelo que llegue el día en que ellos y nosotros podamos concentrar el 100 por ciento de nuestras energías y recursos en nuestros ministerios, que son después de todo los mismos”.Ohmer contó que el pasó 13 años como rector de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James Episcopal Church] en Leesburg, Virginia, descartando cualquier oferta parroquial que le saliera al encuentro, hasta que vio la de la iglesia episcopal de The Falls.“Había algo [atractivo] en este amable, laborioso y paciente grupo de personas”, subrayó él. “Es una historia convincente de personas que realmente creen en sí mismas como una comunidad de fe que es leal a la Iglesia Episcopal, leal al Evangelio y que quiere ser buenas nuevas para la comunidad. Han atravesado por una época realmente difícil, exiliados de su propiedad durante seis, casi siete años”.Rhodes y su familia son del mismo parecer. Cuando el Rdo. Michael Pipkin, que era el sacerdote encargado de la congregación poco después de la separación, necesitó una cirugía de espalda, un sacerdote de la parroquia de Rhodes, la iglesia de Cristo [Christ Church] en Alexandria, estuvo entre los clérigos que lo suplieron. Rhodes, que vive a un par de kilómetros de la iglesia de The Falls, dijo que su familia decidió asistir un domingo de 2008 para que el sacerdote viera algunos rostros que le resultaran familiares en la congregación.“Nunca nos fuimos” apuntó él.“Hay muchísimo entusiasmo, muchísima energía y muchísimo crecimiento” que según Rhodes depende de estar de regreso a la propiedad de Falls Church, y la sensación de mirar hacia fuera desde la iglesia y hacia el futuro que Ohmer aportó a la parroquia.La congregación está considerando la mejor manera de constituirse en buenas nuevas para la comunidad de Falls Church que Ohmer describe, tanto a través de ministerios de acción social como del ministerio para los desamparados [en asociación] con los presbiterianos y a través de una mayor utilización de los edificios de la iglesia. La iglesia abrió sus puertas en apoyo a distintos grupos, a una clase de inglés como segundo idioma y a agrupaciones cívicas que buscan un espacio parea reunirse o para celebrar un banquete.En un caso en particular, una congregación predominantemente afroamericana, que necesitaba un lugar para celebrar su primer aniversario, se puso en contacto con la iglesia episcopal de The Falls y terminó teniendo la celebración en su santuario. Ohmer dijo que, en lo que planificaban esta actividad, se enteraron de que la pastora principal de la congregación no tenía oficina y estaba dirigiendo la iglesia desde su auto y desde un café Starbucks de la localidad. Ella ahora alquila un espacio en la iglesia episcopal de The Falls por un mínimo costo, explicó él.Ohmer agregó que ellos están demostrando que el lema “La Iglesia Episcopal te da la bienvenida” es “verdad en lo que respecta a la comunidad de la fe y es verdad en lo que respecta a los edificios y terrenos”.“Tenemos el objetivo de que la comunidad en su sentido más amplio use un gran porcentaje de la propiedad durante un gran porcentaje del tiempo”.El crecimiento de feligreses —entre 180 y 220 personas que ahora asisten como promedio los domingos— ha incluido a ex miembros que “se fueron cuando vieron lo que estaba ocurriendo respecto a la división”, así como personas que nunca han formado parte de la iglesia de The Falls, personas nuevas en la zona y otros episcopales “que vinieron a ver de qué íbamos”,  explicó Rhodes. La escuela dominical y la agrupación de jóvenes están creciendo en la medida en que se agregan familias jóvenes, añadió.El 15 de mayo, la parroquia le dará oficialmente la bienvenida al último grupo de nuevos visitantes, a quienes Ohmer definió como “un signo externo y visible muy pujante de la energía y vida nuevas que están teniendo lugar aquí”.Y, mientras la iglesia episcopal de The Falls ha estado creciendo y mirando hacia el exterior, y enfrentándose con los dilatados problemas legales, la parroquia ha tenido que lidiar con las secuelas de la división en otro nivel más personal. Las familias se dividieron y aún siguen divididas por las decisiones del año 2006, dijo Ohmer. En algunos casos un cónyuge podía asistir a la congregación anglicana de Falls Church mientras el otro adoraba en la episcopal.Cuando surgen problemas de atención pastoral en esas familias, precisa Ohmer, “ese tipo de diferencias simplemente desaparece. Cuando se trata de cuidado pastoral, nos ocupamos de las familias de unos y otros”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 20, 2013 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [*] La iglesia de  The Falls, le da nombre a la ciudad de Falls Church en Virginia. (N. del.T.) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis La iglesia episcopal de The Falls celebra el pasado y mira hacia el futuro La congregación episcopal puede enfrentar al menos una última traba legal Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

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Japanese Anglicans open support center following earthquakes

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Communion, Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Japanese Anglicans open support center following earthquakes By Alliance staffPosted May 17, 2016 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Alliance] The Anglican Church in Japan is drawing on its experience of the 2011 tsunami to respond to the powerful earthquakes that struck the island nation last month. Twin earthquakes of 6.5- and 7.3-magnitude on April 14 and 16 caused extensive damage in Kumamoto prefecture on Kyushu, the southern island of Japan, killing more than 65 people and injuring nearly 1,600.Anglicans in Kumamoto were among the 112,100 who had to evacuate, the Diocese of Kyushu of Nippon Sei Ko Kai (NSKK – the Anglican Church in Japan) reported. As of May 1, 23,246 people had still not been able to return to their homes, according to the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.The emergency aid organization Japan Platform reported that some 40,039 houses or other buildings were either totally or partially destroyed. Many people have been sleeping in their cars out of fear of possible building collapse due to the ongoing tremors in the area, more than 1,000 to date.The Diocese of Kyushu has opened up Holy Trinity Church in Kumamoto as a support center for those affected by the earthquakes. Among those staffing the response efforts are the Rev. Shibamoto and Hisao Yamomoto, who worked tirelessly assisting victims of the devastating earthquake and ensuing tsunami in March 2011.The team is assessing the needs locally as well as generating funds from within the province. They urge people to send financial support rather than rushing to Kumamoto to help or sending goods. The U.S.-based Episcopal Relief & Development is giving financial support to NSKK. The diocese appreciates the statement of solidarity it has received from its companion link diocese in the Central Philippines.After the crisis – post-quake lessonsAfter a recent visit to Japan, Haiti and Nepal, Anglican Alliance board member Robert Radtke, president of Episcopal Relief & Development, reflected on lessons learned from the earthquake disasters in the three countries, including the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.He noted how essential it is to have responsive national and local government that people trust. A second core learning is the impact of building a culture of disaster risk reduction that combines preparedness with dedicated investment in long-term recovery.Most importantly for the Anglican Communion is how local churches and NGOs, together with international organizations, can support community-based preparedness, recovery and rebuilding in a vital way that supports everyone whether they are members of a faith community or not.He noted that the Anglican Church in Japan had a vibrant and important ministry among the thousands of people who had still not been able to return to their homes or relocate to new permanent homes following the Great East Japan Earthquake.“NSKK [is providing] a singular example of how faith communities continue to offer care and compassion many years after the initial crisis is over,” he said.Support the ResponseDonate to the Diocese of Kyushu appealDonate to Episcopal Relief & Development to support the Diocese of Kyushu responsePray for the people of Kumamoto prefecture affected by the earthquakes and the Diocese of Kyushu as it seeks to respond to human need Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Asia Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

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Bishop calls for prayer as Colombians says ‘no’ to peace…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal churches throughout the Diocese of Colombia have stood with Colombians affected by the conflict. They have provided pastoral care, and humanitarian assistance and shelter to those affected by and internally displaced more than a half-century of armed conflict. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Colombia Bishop Francisco Duque is calling for prayer in the aftermath of an Oct. 2 popular vote in which voters narrowly rejected a peace deal that would have ended more than 50 years of armed conflict between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.“We call on the church to pray a lot so that the necessary accord is reached and so that we can all live as brothers,” said Duque. “Let’s achieve a peace that brings justice, reparations and not repetition.”Sunday’s vote defied polls that predicted overwhelming support for the peace accord. With a total of 99.8 percent of all ballots tallied, 50.2 percent of voters rejected the accord, and 49.8 percent voted “yes” for peace.“We’re still in shock. We haven’t processed the results yet. It was a vote based on emotion, opinion. The people who showed up to vote ‘no’ didn’t want to let anyone know their opinion before so they wouldn’t be judged, but when they went to the polls they expressed themselves,” said Duque in an Oct. 3 interview with Episcopal News Service.“Earlier polling projected that more than 60 percent of the population would vote yes, but the reality was very different, and many people didn’t even turn out to vote,” he said.Less than 38 percent of voters went to the polls.The “no vote” put an end to four years of peace talks. The Colombian government and the FARC, the largest guerrilla group in the country, have been negotiating in Havana, Cuba.The referendum wasn’t legally necessary to implement the peace accord negotiated between the government and FARC. However, the president of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, thought that a popular vote would lend legitimacy to the accord.On the night of Oct. 2, Santos regretfully recognized the referendum’s outcome. “Today I address the country as president of all Colombians, of both those who voted yes and those who voted no. I called for a referendum. The majority, be it by a very narrow margin, said ‘no.’ I am the first to recognize the result,” he said.Via Twitter on Oct. 2 the FARC wrote: “To the Colombian people who dream of peace, [you can] count on us. Peace will prevail.”In June, the government and the FARC signed a historic ceasefire, which Santos said on Oct. 4 that he would extend until Oct. 31.The guerilla leader, Rodrigo Londoño, alias “Timochenko,” issued a statement confirming the ceasefire from Cuba following the vote’s results. “FARC-EP reiterates its willingness to use only words as weapons for building toward the future,” he wrote.Duque indicated that the reaffirmation of the ceasefire is a hopeful sign.“The people have had doubts about what the FARC will get [after the accord], but all of us want an end to the war. As a church we see our role will be to reconcile brothers with such polarized opinions and to pursue building peace together,” he said.Though, he added, the church recognizes that the way forward will not be easy.Last May, before the ceasefire, the Episcopal Diocese of Colombia agreed at a national convention to support the peace process, offering the government its facilities as “spaces for exercises in reconciliation to succeed in building a sustainable peace.”(The Episcopal Diocese of Colombia is one of seven dioceses that make up the Episcopal Church’s ninth province, which covers Central and South America and the Caribbean.)Colombians most affected by the war voted ‘yes.’ Since the mid-1960s government forces, left-wing guerrillas and right-wing paramilitaries have been fighting a civil war rooted in inequality that has killed more than 220,000 Colombians. Some 6.7 million people are displaced inside Colombia, about 13 percent of the 47 million inhabitants. Another 360,000 refugees have fled abroad, most to Ecuador – which hosts the largest number of refugees in Latin America, and another 170,000 have fled to Venezuela.Churches throughout the Diocese of Colombia have stood with those affected by the conflict. They have provided pastoral care, and humanitarian assistance and shelter to Colombians affected by and internally displaced more than a half-century of armed conflict.The church also has assisted Colombian refugees to rebuild their lives in Ecuador.According to information gathered by the magazine Semana of Colombia, a majority of voters in areas most affected by armed conflict supported the peace accord. In mountainous regions like Chocó, Caquetá, and Nariiño where the presence of war lingers, more than 60 percent of the votes were “yes” votes for peace.Former Colombian President Álvaro Uribe led the “no vote,”  saying it was too lenient on the rebels.— Clara Villatoro is a freelance journalist based in El Salvador. Lynette Wilson, an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service, contributed to this report. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop calls for prayer as Colombians says ‘no’ to peace accord Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Colombia Peace Agreement The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Clara Villatoro Posted Oct 5, 2016 Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

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Episcopal Church bishops challenge Trump, Congress on DACA in NYTimes…

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ September 21, 2017 at 9:59 pm I am confused. Is the bishop of long island declaring that the merits of immigration policies should not be debated by the American people, or that the church’s right to weigh in on such matters should not be debated? Maybe I read his statement out of context. It’s possible. September 25, 2017 at 2:27 pm It was not an Executive Order, it was a Memo to Homeland Security. No matter what you call it, it was Executive Overreach by Obama. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service] Some 125 Episcopal Church bishops signed a full-page ad that ran Sept. 21 in the New York Times, imploring President Donald Trump and member of Congress not to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the program known as DACA.“To do so would endanger the lives of thousands of young people and their families and run contrary to the faith and moral traditions of our country,” wrote 122 bishops, along with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, 26th Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and 25th Presiding Bishop Frank T. Griswold. “It is unfair to threaten the well-being of young people who arrived in our country as children through no choice of their own.”The Rev. Richard Witt, executive director of Rural & Migrant Ministries, brought the idea to the Rt. Rev. Lawrence C. Provenzano, bishop of the Diocese of Long Island. His diocese is among, if not, the most diverse in the church, in part because Queens, New York is the most diverse county in nation.“The prayer book is in 13 different languages in our diocese,” Provenzano told Episcopal News Service. “This is in defense of the people in our pews and in our neighborhoods.”Starting with Witt and Provenzano, then adding three other bishops, they organized the declaration and after Curry agreed, they sent an email through their list serve to all bishops with a deadline to sign on. It’s unclear the reason some bishops didn’t sign the statement, but if it wasn’t about avoiding controversy, it could have been as simple as not noticing the email in time to make the deadline.“I heard from bishops up until Tuesday morning, and it was submitted to the New York Times Tuesday (Sept. 19) afternoon,” said Denise Fillion, Long Island’s diocesan director of communications. Fillion helped with the final edits on the ad.The bishops said ending DACA without a similar replacement program would force so-called “Dreamers” to “face the future in this country with little access to education and employment, and ultimately, could very well lead to sending them to countries where they did not grow up, have few support structures, may not even speak the language and may be vulnerable to violence and persecution.”“Any of these scenarios, we believe, is cruel,” the bishops wrote.The administration announced Sept. 5 that it would phase out the DACA policy, giving Congress six months to act legislatively to save the program that allowed qualifying undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to remain in the country.President Barack Obama instituted DACA in June 2012 by executive action, giving so-called “Dreamers” the ability to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and eligibility for work permits.Naysayers might call this is another example of Episcopalians entering into politics too much, said Provenzano. It’s not about politics, although this public stance has “significant implications,” he said.“At times, the teaching and preaching of the gospel can look like it’s making a political statement when it’s really about following the teachings of Jesus. This is what bishops are supposed to do. This is nuts and bolts,” Provenzano said. “It’s not a debatable issue. The kind of protectionism being promulgated in this country is contrary to the gospel.”The Episcopal Church’s presiding officers, Curry and House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, issued a statement after the Trump administration’s announcement, vowing to work for immigration reform and to support Dreamers.The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, as well as its Episcopal Public Policy Network, has long been engaged in advocacy for “a humane and proportional immigration system,” based on the General Convention’s stance on the issues involved. The office has a collection of resources for advocacy and action on immigration policy, as well as information on current policies and proposed legislation.“In recent years, our congregations throughout the United States have witnessed firsthand the benefits that the young ‘Dreamers’ have brought to our community programs and life,” the bishops wrote. “We have been inspired by, and gained much from, their American spirit. We urge you to enact permanent, meaningful legislation that will protect ‘Dreamers’ and enable these young people to remain a part of our country — which is also theirs.”The complete text of the ad is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service, as well as a writer and editor based in Brooklyn, New York. M. J. Wise says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: September 23, 2017 at 10:13 pm These Episcopal Bishops are like the band playing on as the Titanic sunk. Very sad. Rector Washington, DC Kenneth Knapp says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 September 23, 2017 at 12:20 am We need to protect our Dreamers, first of all, because they are children of God… They are also very valuable members of our American society who are seeking to study, work, and better themselves and our society. Thanks to our Bishops for speaking out about DACA and for calling our elected officials to act justly. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA September 21, 2017 at 8:59 pm DACA is a sad illustration of the danger of relying on the executive branch for immigration policy change. All it took was one unfavorable administration change and the whole thing came clattering down (not that the judicial branch was going to let it linger much longer anyway). Just one of many checks Barack Obama wrote that bounced in the end, probably deluded into thinking he had created the perpetual Democratic presidency and that he had made Congress obsolete. I feel bad for the people who were induced into revealing their information to immigration authorities for nought. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Rev. Victor Conrado says: September 23, 2017 at 11:34 am Do not fear. The death of the Episcopal Church will not come because our Bishops are taking a stand on something “political.” The death of the Episcopal Church and Christianity as a whole will come when we stop actively, courageously caring for people and retreat to the sanctity of our pews and leave the politicizing to those driven to divide and cast the weak out. Our Bishops know whose they are: heirs in baptism of the King of Kings who sought to bring people together and who envisioned a place at the table for all. Our work to protect the young people covered by DACA secures our place along with others in history who made it possible for slavery to end and women to vote. “The Lord is my light and my salvation– whom shall I fear?” Ps. 27:1 September 22, 2017 at 10:17 pm To quote Walter Russell Mead from the Feb 2010 issue of the American Interest: “Episcopalians are a tiny minority of the population and the church long ago lost its social power and cachet. The Episcopal church today is in the worst condition it has been since the aftermath of the Revolution; its clergy has visibly failed to keep the church together or prevent its ongoing decline. I’m afraid that the penchant to make political pronouncements proceeds less from a true prophetic vocation than from a nostalgia for a time when it mattered what Episcopal bishops thought. In any case, there is nothing more ridiculous than a proprietor of a failing concern who officiously lectures everyone else on how to manage their affairs. Please, for the sake of what remains of the dignity of your office, give it a rest.” Episcopal Church bishops challenge Trump, Congress on DACA in NYTimes ad The Very Reverend Tom Callard says: Susan Russell says: September 23, 2017 at 6:04 am ¡Me enorgullece ser Episcopal! Nuestros obispos siguen las acciones de Jesús: abogar por las personas marginadas aún cuando la sociedad crítica sus acciones. El gesto no es para hacerse popular, sino para demostrar lo que es ser verdaderamente cristiano/a según los evangelios y las acciones de Jesucristo. ¡Bravo y bendiciones!Stories like this make me an even prouder Episcopalian. Our Bishops are following the actions of our Lord: to advocate for marginalized peoples despite the criticism from religious and secular society. Their support is not to win a popularity contest, it is a demonstration of the Christian values that Jesus taught in the Gospels through his own actions. People of limited Christian understanding may call the bishop’s statement political, I invite you to study the Gospels with a prayerful mind and heart, their response is an act of Christian justice. Our Bishops are indeed following Christ’s mandate, all Christians must do the same. Bravo bishops! Richard Basta says: September 29, 2017 at 7:08 pm President Trump is doing the right thing. He is forcing Congress to act and work within our laws to help these DACA children become U.S. citizens. M. J. Wise says: September 22, 2017 at 10:10 am If we do nothing, the Church, itself, will be in trouble. September 23, 2017 at 2:25 pm DACA is one of those signs of hope that we need to celebrate, especially when lives are changed and new opportunities are created for our New Generation [email protected] I have witnessed this change in action and the benefits of a life fully changed and engaged in the political and social conversations that we are invited to attend. President Obama felt the need to do something to get the conversation started. I appreciate the statement on DACA from our bishops. I hope their words are followed now by parish / conversation level conversations on what it means to give hope to someone. Let us stay at the table and continue with this effort. Submit a Press Release September 25, 2017 at 11:51 am We would not have a DACA problem if those in the congress who believe in open borders would change the laws with regards to immigration. Why does not the dem leadership propose bills to eliminate our current immigration laws and allow those who want to come here immediate admission? This is what they believe and what is in their hearts. Answer is that the dems know that they would not get re-elected. Most real Americans need and want immigration laws that all civilized nations have including mexico. The dems in congress know that they can’t push their agenda into law cuz they won’t get re-elected. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL September 23, 2017 at 11:40 am Amen… Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Immigration, The Rev. Dr. Albert Cutie says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Jeannette Giese says: September 23, 2017 at 9:19 pm Speaking out on issues of the day is a long Christian tradition. The conservatives do it all the time. Pat Robertson, Jim Baker, and that ilk. As for quoting the Bible, the conservative have not problem in selectively using Scripture to back many of their brand of Christianity. About 2000 years ago, a wise Jewish person was asked what the two most important statements were in the Torah, he replied, to love the Lord your God with all your heart and mind and to love your neighbor as yourself. Then he added, everything else is commentary. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Liz Benage says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Doug Desper says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Children, Lorenzo Lebrija says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA September 23, 2017 at 7:58 am It would seem my church of seventy-seven years has once again crossed the line of the broad interpretation of Jesus saying ” Render unto Caesar those things which are Caesar’s…….”. This statement was surely meant to signify the separation between the provincial authorities of Church and State. Would the Church be tolerant and understanding if the Federal Government began weighing in on the policies of the Episcopal Church? I rather doubt it. Submit an Event Listing Kenneth Knapp says: By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Amy SowderPosted Sep 21, 2017 Featured Events Donald w. Mudra says: The Reverend Canon Susan Russell says: September 22, 2017 at 10:59 am The word in the first sentence above was ment to be comforting, not conforming and later another word should have been were not we’re. I really do like spell checkers most of the time. September 22, 2017 at 1:09 pm > it was to exercise the Jewish / Christian ethic of welcoming and caring for the foreigners in our land (although the Dreamers are foreigners only in a legal context).Of course, as Episcopalians, it is always our duty to welcome all. I certainly would turn tail on any church where I was asked for my papers, and I’m sure you would too. But, as Thomas Jefferson once said (more or less), the United States Government is not based, modeled, or founded upon, in any sense, the Christian religion. Given that official disestablishment nearly killed the Episcopal Church, I would think an Episcopalian would be first to realize that. Mr. Obama induced immigrants who he knew were not here legally to reveal detailed information to immigration authorities with promises he could not keep and, frankly, should have known he could not keep. Shame on him and those who cheered on such an unprudential and irresponsible scheme. P.J. Cabbiness says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Donald Trump, September 22, 2017 at 9:16 pm You should be careful with OT proof texts. You might not like everything that the OT “proves.” September 26, 2017 at 9:57 pm DACA was against the law. The Executive branch of our government enforces the law. Pres. Obama couldn’t get the Congress to make law concerning DACA so Pesident Obama made the law. President Trump has given Congress 6 months to come up with legislation for the Dreamers. Not throw them out of the country. We shall see what happens, but President Trump has done what is within his power under the law. CHECK the school districts in your area. Are they teaching Civics? For those who may not know, because it hasn’t been taught for a while, Civics was a requirement to graduate from High School!! Civics is the study of how our government works. I’d be willing to bet that it is NOT being taught, nor is it a requirement. There are good teachers out there , like my husband, but there are teachers who want to dumb down our children’s education. Pay attention. It is our future here. Yes, we need to help people, but without borders and law it is Chaos. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET September 23, 2017 at 12:40 pm Jesus stood with the marginalized then the church, the body of Christ stands with the marginalized now. GRACIAS, bishops for leading the way to be Christ in the world. Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: September 22, 2017 at 10:53 am Selective memory of even recent history may be conforming for those selecting those items that fit their world view; but they are seldom accurate. It is important to remember that that a majority of legislators in the Republican party vowed to obstruct ANYTHING that President Obama proposed and we’re often successful in those attempts. Therefor the President used what tools he had at his disposal to do the right, moral, and humane thing, in this case his executive order for DACA. His objective was not to make “… Congress obsolete” it was to exercise the Jewish / Christian ethic of welcoming and caring for the foreigners in our land (although the Dreamers are foreigners only in a legal context). The Dreamers are really the children of this country, and when have we started rejecting our children? Kjell Johansen says: Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Ernie Hammel says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. September 24, 2017 at 8:56 pm Separation of church and state. Rector Bath, NC Norman Hutchinson says: Norman Hutchinson says: Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC September 22, 2017 at 1:46 pm Proud of bishops taking their leadership on this important issue into the public arena … an awesome antidote to the increasing irrelevance of the church to the world. (See also attendance figures noted above.)As for the “stay out of politics” critique … this isn’t politics in the partisan sense — which we should stay out of. This is preaching the political implications of an ancient imperative of our historic faith. Need proof texts? Gotcha covered:Exodus 22:21 You shall not wrong or oppress a resident alien, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt.Exodus 23:9 You shall not oppress a resident alien; you know the heart of an alien, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt.Leviticus 19:33 When an alien resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress the alien.Leviticus 24:22 You shall have one law for the alien and for the citizen: for I am the Lord your God.Numbers 15:16 You and the alien who resides with you shall have the same law and the same ordinance.Deuteronomy 1:16 I charged your judges at that time: “Give the members of your community a fair hearing, and judge rightly between one person and another, whether citizen or resident alien.Deuteronomy 24:20-21 When you beat your olive trees, do not strip what is left; it shall be for the alien, the orphan, and the widow. When you gather the grapes of your vineyard, do not glean what is left; it shall be for the alien, the orphan, and the widow.Deuteronomy 27:19“Cursed be anyone who deprives the alien, the orphan, and the widow of justice.” All the people shall say, “Amen!”Jeremiah 7:4-12 Do not trust in these deceptive words: “This is the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.”For if you truly amend your ways and your doings, if you truly act justly one with another, if you do not oppress the alien, the orphan, and the widow, or shed innocent blood in this place, and if you do not go after other gods to your own hurt, then I will dwell with you in this place, in the land that I gave of old to your ancestors forever and ever.Zechariah 7:10 Do not oppress the widow, the orphan, the alien, or the poor; and do not devise evil in your hearts against one another.Malachi 3:5 Then I will draw near to you for judgment; I will be swift to bear witness against the sorcerers, against the adulterers, against those who swear falsely, against those who oppress the hired workers in their wages, the widow and the orphan, against those who thrust aside the alien, and do not fear me, says the Lord of hosts. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Joel Marcus Johnson, Ret’d. says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group September 23, 2017 at 12:46 am PS — Abd then there’s Matthew 25:40. For what it’s worth. Submit a Job Listing Faith & Politics, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Rev. Daniel Velez says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Dn. Dorothy Royal says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN David Horwath says: September 23, 2017 at 6:46 pm Two concepts are disappearing from the American, and I fear religious, moral ethos. First is the principle of refuge, of accepting persons, and their children, who have fled the prospect of death or ruin in their native lands. Second is mere history, especially those chapters in which this nation has precipitated horrors in Central America causing such refugees to flee. Considering that the vast majority of DACA candidates are from these nations, let us review those chapters in which for the sake of cheap bananas in mid-century and later cheap illegal drugs, the United States in the former instance walked in lock step with those dictatorships, and in the latter our permissiveness has ruined countless millions of Central American families of their lands and homes, not to mention our own domestic drug crisis. Much of my vocation has been dedicated to assisting such refugees in the sacramental life of the Church, so that I am most intimate to their life stories in the real as opposed to abstract sense. We make hypocrites of ourselves when at Christmas we sing “Jesus our brother, kind and good,” but then make an orphan of the Holy Infant the day after, that is, refusing to bless those others like Him, also “born in a stable rude.” And so I say Amen with the brother bishops of The Episcopal Church. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Very Rev. Albert Cutié says: September 22, 2017 at 1:10 pm Perhaps Bishop Provenzano should start by asking himself why the Diocese of Long Island has had a 27% drop in Average Sunday Attendance. Perhaps the Bishop should concentrate on his own flock rather than impose his cultural views and thought police on the rest of us. September 23, 2017 at 5:54 pm The activism to preserve DACA seems like talking points in need of an issue. Trump and the Congress have all stated that people will not be displaced who are here actually living according to DACA and immigration expectations: job/school, gainful, crime-free, etc. The 6 month period to write a durable law to take the place of a dictate has to occur. Do people ever read the Constitution or our laws before opening up their cans of perpetual outrage? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ September 25, 2017 at 2:35 pm The death of the Episcopal Church will come when its members walk out. September 22, 2017 at 3:54 pm I see our pews thinning out even more. We are a country of laws, we have a Congress, not a dictator. Trump did right by reversing an illegal executive memo and sending DACA to Congress. If Obama would have taken that route this wouldn’t be happening now. The 5th Circuit, as well as the US Supreme Court, would have struck Obama’s memo down as unconstitutional and the DACA kids would be deported. Trump actually gave them a second chance. Susan be careful quoting scripture out of historic context to make a point, it may come back and bite you. September 25, 2017 at 2:33 pm The Nazis were “children of God” as well. Beware of the trap you are walking into. These type arguments do nothing but divide. I would suggest you admonish people to follow the laws and obey them. Our laws are what wholes us together. You should have spoke up when Obama sent the DACA Memo to Homeland Security and bypassed Congress. Don’t tell me you care about the Dreamers if you kept silent. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR House of Bishops, Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (30) Charles B. Allen II says: last_img read more

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Episcopal delegation to COP23 encouraged by talk of taking action…

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags David Paulsen says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Mary Barrett says: Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC November 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm Thanks for your comments, Mary, but could you clarify what dismays you about the Episcopal Church’s resolutions? It sounds like they are generally in line with what you are suggesting is necessary. Submit a Job Listing November 23, 2017 at 12:39 am 2009-DO31 called for U.S. to lower atmospheric carbon as CO2 by 25 % by 2020. Someone find any scientific study from that timeframe showing how that was possible without hard economic impacts to all classes of society.2009-CO12 urges scientific integrity in environmental policy.2009-CO70 concerning the church’s facilities: made public commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 % within 10 years. Did anyone have a plan for such an impossible goal for almost every facility?2012-BO23 Read this, as it is long and I will only capture what I read. It resolves to work for the just transformation away from all fossil fuels, then lumps them all together “including all forms of oil, coal, and natural gas.” It is this vast statement that lumps all fossil fuels together, yet environmental impacts vary tremendously. And then we are to resist the development of what is termed “unconventional” and probably natural gas is in there for writers of this. Well, I wish Germany had the natural gas resources to fully substitute for coal.Of course the resolutions had draft histories which get at author’s intents, and that is useful.I know people work hard and mean for good, but it reads as easy words with a lot of duality, the evil fossil fuels and the companies pushing them. This administration is a wash for finding the middle ground. But an article came out the other day in an engineering magazine about 4 major oil companies still pursuing plans to decrease methane leakage in facilities. But not all, Chevron was notably absent. So who talks to them, embarrassing them for not keeping up with their peers? Regulations will never be enough and actually failed miserably in the history of oilfield wastes. Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. November 25, 2017 at 10:37 am Is it possible to be part of the Divine Dance when the climate-change reality brings up a lot of raw emotions in working for a better future? Since climate change has moved into the world of litigation, oil industry responses are driven to a large extent by sophisticated law firms. Even the way that some sign on to a public declaration of reducing natural-gas leakage vs those that do not, is driven by different attorney teams. Chevron and Ecuador has seared into their legal culture how to respond to charges about oilfield waste impacts that will lead to litigation (and do not judge that case and people until fully studying both sides). So consider the patterns of what major defense firms do, and use that. The “Ropel Proposal” related to the tobacco industry laid out a familiar strategy when trying to control “negative” outcomes to a particular industry: “litigation, politics and public opinion” (thank you Robert Proctor).This is reality, and if I (or you) burn out in righteous indignation or poor action choices based on my ego-driven duality, I will not accomplish the things that I believe God has willed for me (or you or the Church). I have no doubt that the Holy Spirit is present and knows the way through this. May we listen. Environment & Climate Change Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Episcopalians representing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry welcome visitors to their booth in the public zone of the COP23 conference in Bonn, Germany. Photo courtesy of Marc Andrus[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians have returned home after spending two weeks in Bonn, Germany, representing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and contributing voices of faith in support of environmental stewardship during the U.N. climate change summit held there.The Nov. 6-17 conference, officially known as the 23rd Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, or COP23, was an annual intergovernmental meeting to focus on global dialogue and action. The Episcopal Church, granted observer status, sent about a dozen Episcopalians to continue the church’s advocacy that began at the previous two conferences.“The Episcopal Church, through the presiding bishop’s delegation, is taking a very strong presence in the life of these climate summits,” Diocese of California Bishop Marc Andrus told Episcopal News Service after returning from COP23. “We’re making strong networks in the faith communities.”Andrus and his wife, Sheila Andrus, spent the full two weeks in Bonn, while two groups of Episcopalians alternated in participating in the first week and then the second week. They led daily worship services, maintained a booth with information on the church’s environmental advocacy and, on a more limited basis, were able as observers to enter the U.N. zone where the intergovernmental negotiations were occurring.Diocese of California Bishop Marc Andrus helps lead an opening chant at an interfaith prayer service in Bonn, Germany, before delivering a statement titled “Walk Gently on the Earth” to the COP23 leadership. Photo courtesy of Marc Andrus“I’m very, very grateful to Presiding Bishop [Michael] Curry for trusting us, this delegation, with this work that I consider so vital, and it’s a great honor to serve,” Andrus said. “Our church is responding in an important and beautiful way.”The Episcopal Church has made environmental justice one of its three priorities, in addition to racial reconciliation and evangelism, and General Convention has passed numerous resolutions on the issue, whether supporting federal climate action or pledging to mitigating the church’s own impact on the environment. A 2015 resolution created the Advisory Council on the Stewardship of Creation to support “ecologically responsible stewardship of church-related properties and buildings.”Through its Office of Governmental Relations and the Episcopal Public Policy Network, the church has advocated for government policies in line with General Convention stances on climate change, and the House of Bishops made environmental justice one of the themes of its September meeting in Alaska.An Episcopal group was in Paris, France, in December 2015 to make a spiritual case for climate action during COP21. At that conference, member countries, including the United States, reached a landmark agreement to set voluntary goals aimed at keeping global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius, which scientists think would be necessary to prevent a spiraling catastrophe of melting glaciers, rising sea levels and related weather extremes.The COP23 summit was intended to build on the Paris agreement, but the agreement’s effectiveness was thrown into doubt this year when President Donald Trump said he would withdraw from the accord rather than hold the U.S. to its pledge to dramatically reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.“We remain open to the possibility of rejoining at a later date under terms more favorable to the American people,” U.S. diplomat Judith Garber said last week at COP23.The Trump administration’s noncommittal stance loomed over COP23, where negotiators began drafting the rules for how the member countries will be expected to report their emissions reductions. Final approval of that framework could come when the next U.N. conference is held in Poland.“If the United States does not keep its commitment, that’s a very poor predictor of the success of the Paris agreement,” Andrus said.He and the rest of the Episcopal delegation were encouraged by the presence in Bonn of what has been called the “We’re Still In” movement. While the Trump administration participated in the U.N.’s intergovernmental negotiations, an alternate, unofficial American delegation in Bonn included U.S. lawmakers and leaders of states and cities, as well as business and faith leaders. They vowed to live up to the United States’ Paris agreement commitments – thus the label “We’re Still In” – even if the federal government won’t.“The end result of this COP23 is being seen as a rather positive and fruitful outcome, all things considered,” Lynnaia Main, the Episcopal Church’s representative to the U.N., said in an email to ENS after attending part of the conference. “Member states demonstrated unparalleled commitment to the Paris agreement, although there is an urgent need to increase their level of ambition.”The plight of various Pacific island nations was a recurring theme at COP23, due to the direct effect that rising ocean levels will have on their ability to survive. Main said the prime minister of Tuvalu had warned that his country would be submerged by 2030 if nothing is done to limit or reverse climate change.Those low-lying countries’ request for an increase in financial assistance, however, was not approved, Andrus said. The result could be dire.“They are losing their lives. Samoa, for instance, has been inhabited for about 3,000 years, and this is their home and it’s deeply threatened by rising water levels,” he said. “This is not distant future or even near future. This is happening.”What could a small group of Episcopalians hope to contribute in a place like Bonn? At COP23, Andrus said the church and other faith communities were welcomed by participants and visitors who were eager to ground their activism in shared values.People of faith are climate activists, Andrus said. “Our spiritual values are the basis from which we act.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By David PaulsenPosted Nov 21, 2017 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal delegation to COP23 encouraged by talk of taking action on climate change Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Mary Barrett says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Mary Barrett says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Mary Barrett says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 November 23, 2017 at 2:01 pm Today’s New York Times had a review of another great book by Jeff Goodell entitled “The Water Will Come.” I so agree with one of his points that we are doing very little to prepare for what we know is going to happen, continued rising sea levels. Meanwhile, we bog down and burn out as we attack the Other on issues of controlling climate change. In my own way, that is what I try to do, be fully integrated in ways to add to the funds that have to go to coastal Louisiana to modify what we can in the next 25 years. Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (5) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID November 21, 2017 at 11:35 pm I have read through the resolutions. Does the Church read the current news of how even Germany cannot meet its goals because of coal? Your resolutions may make some Episcopalians feel better, but it really dismays me. A proposal put forward in 2015 called for skipping ALL fossil fuels and just move to renewables. Wow, you need some knowledge about energy amounts used and future projections. Read the non-partisan Energy Information agency website for statistics. Pray that we can even get this world to move away from coal by natural gas usage on way to a renewable usage that we do not even have the technology for yet. Gosh, God gave us brains to study data to create a better future. Really, as a scientist and a fairly new Episcopalian. I was stunned at such work. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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