In Brief

first_imgBakels’ Low Gi bread mix helped the firm take the titles of Oxfordshire Business of the Year and Innovation of the Year. The Bicester-based company launched a successful marketing campaign behind the product, which included leafleting 1.3 million consumers through 1,300 independent bakers. Bakels now has plans for a new consumer PR campaign in the autumn.The Cereals Industry Resource Centre is a new CD-Rom designed to answer questions that commonly arise in the sector, including topics such as sampling and testing, food safety and targeting the market. Get a copy by visiting: www.cerealsindustryforum.org.uk.Brace’s Bakery will hand out grants of up to £500 to charities and community groups in Carmarthenshire as part of its relaunched Bread for the Community Fund. The firm has already provided thousands of pounds worth of help, ranging from sports team sponsorship to new play equipment.ARMed robber Simon Brown, 31, from Kirkbymoorside, has been jailed for three years at York Crown Court for threatening a teenage assistant at Woodheads bakers in Dean Road, Scarborough, with a kitchen knife and stealing £270 from the till.Royal Cosun subsidiary Unifine Food & Bake Ingredients has signed a deal to acquire Mundipam Productos Alimentares, a Portuguese producer of pastry and bakery ingredients, as part of its bid to become one of the top three suppliers of fine bakery ingredients in Europe.last_img read more

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Foreign foray

first_imgRecent statistics released by market development consultancy Food from Britain (FFB) show British bakery exports are booming, with sales of bread, biscuits and cakes increasing by nearly 7% over the January-September 2006 period, reaching £351 million. And with UK companies respected for their high-quality products, there has never been a better time to look to new markets overseas.”The UK baking industry is acknowledged as being among the most innovative in the world,” says Chris Brockman, research manager at FFB. “This reputation gives British companies an excellent advantage when it comes to developing a sales network in foreign countries. International markets differ considerably, with consumer tastes and trends varying from country to country. However, our extensive research can accurately pinpoint the various opportunities that exist for specific product types in individual markets.”The recent research has identified the biscuit market in the USA as a key growth area for British products, with exports to the country rising by more than 21% between 2004 and 2005. According to Pavel Kolarov, senior consultant at FFB North America, this is largely due to the excellent reputation of British products in this sector, partly fuelled by the large expatriate communities and a strong tourist market.”With the country as large as it is, it’s difficult to generalise trends and opportunities on a national level,” says Kolarov. “For instance, British biscuits are understandably more popular in areas with large expatriate communities, such as Florida and the East Coast, and California.”We have established, however, that there are certain types of biscuit that are proving increasingly popular with US consumers, leading to opportunities for British exporters.” For example, British premium chocolate-coated biscuits have always been well-received by the American public. However, as UK chocolate is very different and a lot richer than American chocolate, these products are seen as indulgent, luxury items, not mass-market products as they are in the UK.Growth in healthy snackingThe UK is now seeing increased consumer demand for healthy snacking and, according to Pavel, this trend is being echoed in the health-focused American snack market. Water crackers and crispbreads are proving popular, with British companies such as Carr’s and Jacob’s establishing themselves in the US market as the demand for low-fat and ’free-from’ alternatives increases, opening up new opportunities for British firms.”Although numerous American companies are producing low-fat biscuits, there will always be room for British alternatives on supermarket shelves,” says Kolarov. However, where British manufacturers have the real edge is in the production of snack products for allergy sufferers. Whereas the UK market has been quick to pick up on this potentially huge sector, American producers have been slow to react. British expertise in this area is widely respected, with American consumers now coveting the choice and quality of products enjoyed by their British counterparts.”Gluten-free items are especially sought after, and I would urge any British companies manufacturing these products to seriously look into taking advantage of this opportunity.”According to FFB’s Nordic office, opportunities exist for British bakery companies closer to home, too, with exports of breads, pastries and cakes to Denmark increasing by an impressive 17.7% between 2005 and 2006, reaching a value of £9.4m.Jakob True, director of FFB Nordic, believes this increase can be partly attributed to the growth in popularity of in-store bakeries in large supermarkets and hypermarkets. “Many more large food stores in the region are following the British trend of having in-store bakeries,” he says. “This has created a huge opportunity for British own-label companies who can now supply ready-to-bake products.”In-store bakeries are proving very profitable for the supermarkets, as they provide a good image and an enticing aroma and Danish firms are looking to capitalise on British expertise in this sector.”opportunities for Own-label breadSpeciality bread from Britain is also highly regarded in Denmark and across the Nordic region. UK producers are seen as being at the forefront of this product segment, whereas many speciality products, especially of ethnic origin, are relatively new to Nordic consumers.”The introduction of speciality breads into Nordic markets has been tremendously popular,” says True. “Nordic stores have been, and still are, looking to British companies to help develop this new segment in the market, and many producers are taking advantage of that opportunity.”Honeytop Speciality Foods is one such company. The firm, which was recently named ’Cereals Exporter of the Year’ at the annual Food from Britain Export Awards, exports naan breads to several countries across Europe, with Denmark and the wider Nordic region representing more than 40% of its total export sales.After researching the market, the company identified own-label as the best way to get its naan breads to market and, in 2005, it was awarded a contract to supply supermarkets Bilka, Føtex, and Netto, all part of the Dansk Supermarked group.”Supplying Dansk Supermarked stores has given a tremendous boost to our export business,” says Pauline Ball, business development controller for Europe at Honeytop. Multilingual packaging had to be developed and a suitable display carton had to be designed to suit the stores’ automated warehousing and on-shelf display requirements. Recipe changes had to be made, due to legislative requirements, but some changes were also made to the flavour profile to suit Danish consumers’ tastes.”It has been a very successful exercise that has now led to us expanding into other Nordic markets, including Finland, where we have now secured a listing in Kesko, the largest retail store in the country.” n? For advice on exporting bakery goods, contact Food from Britain on 0207 233 5111 or visit [http://www.foodfrombritain.co.uk].last_img read more

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Weight relaxation just for wrapped bread

first_imgCraft bakers selling unwrapped loaves cannot take advantage of the recent relaxation of bread weight laws, which abandons specified loaf quantities, because the new legislation only applies to packaged bread.As reported in British Baker, an EC directive to be introduced next April will scrap ancient restrictions that limit loaf sizes, weighing more than 300g, to multiples of 400g. However, unwrapped bread falls outside the directive’s scope.The National Weights and Measures Laboratory (NWML) has launched a consultation, due to close in January, proposing that rules governing unwrapped bread weights should be relaxed in line with packaged loaves.In the meantime, The National Association of Master Bakers is advising craft bakers who sell unwrapped loaves to stick to the ’400g rule’ until the rules are clear. “Bakers need to be sure they are not going to fall foul of their Trading Standards Officers (TSOs),” said a spokesperson.LACORS told British Baker that, in “99.9% of cases”, TSOs would not prosecute bakers selling unwrapped bread outside specified quantities, but that they would be “technically breaking the law”.Warburtons and Tesco are among those already selling packaged loaves outside the traditional 400g-multiple format.last_img read more

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Dramatic fall for Starbucks profits

first_imgRestructuring and “significant transition” for Starbucks Corporation has seen its profits crash 96.6% to $5.4m, compared with $158.5m in its fourth quarter last year. The coffee chain’s fourth-quarter results, ended 28 September, and full fiscal 2008 results also reveal a fall in operating profit for the year from $1.1bn in fiscal 2007, to $504m.The company said it will be adopting a “more cautious approach” in the UK and Western Europe, with regard to new store openings, with only 700 net new stores planned internationally.In the US, Starbucks’ 2009 store opening target was “approximately a negative 20 net new stores”, according to the statement. This includes a nearly 225 company-operated store decline and approximately 205 net new licensed stores.This year saw the closure of approximately 600 company-operated stores in the US and 61 company-owned stores in Australia, costing the firm $105.1m in restructuring and other transformation strategy costs, which had a detrimental effect on its net income.last_img read more

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Subscribe Online

first_imgBritish Baker is the business magazine for everyone in today’s baking industry.It is the only pan-industry title reaching into the plant, craft, supermarket, ingredient, equipment, in-store bakery, food-to-go, snacks, hot beverages and soft drinks markets. British Baker is the trusted, independent information hub for the entire bakery supply chain, delivering: News and news analysis ‘How to’ guides Movers and shakers Business information on legislation Best selling products Market trends Price monitors Supplements** SEE THE DIGITAL MAGAZINE SAMPLE! ** If you would like to see a browseable version of British Baker magazine as it looks ’on-paper’… but ’on-screen’ – simply click here or on the button on the right hand side. Annual Subscription (Fortnightly editions) > UK Price: £67.00 > EU Price: £127.00 > Rest of World Price: £171.00last_img read more

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’Traditional bread’ sales break £200m in ISBs

first_imgLast year saw the revival of traditional bread and rolls selling through supermarket in-store bakeries (ISBs), with sales of traditional breads breaking through the £200m barrier.The latest IRI sales data, (52 w/e 27 December 2008), shows that traditional rolls soared by 23%, while traditional bread was up 15%. Growth outstripped that of the speciality breads sector, which rose 7%, while speciality rolls fell by 4%.Category growth was fuelled, in part, by plain breads, which were up 8.3% on 2007, while premium breads, priced between £1 and £2, were still showing strong growth by the year end.Muffins, Viennoiserie, Danish and French baguettes all saw double-digit growth. But ISB bagel sales slumped by a disappointing 13%, as did patisserie, which was down nearly a third.Kate Raison, marketing director of bake-off supplier Bakehouse, which supplied the data exclusively to BB, said new bread launches were focusing on health, while seeded breads remained popular. Changes to weight legislation would free up opportunities to develop new formats and sizes, she added.last_img read more

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Food-safe sanitisers

first_imgThe Country Range Group has expanded its professional range of cleaning products for 2010, with the addition of a food-safe sanitiser and a heavy-duty degreaser, both in five-litre bottles. It has also launched a range of napkins, in two sizes. These are initially available in white, but there are plans to add more colours in the near future.Country Range Group MD Colin Birchall said that, more than ever before, there is no room for complacency when it comes to hygiene. Since January 1, 2006, changes in legislation have required all food businesses to have a documented food safety management system, showing how they ensure safe food.”Behind the scenes in a commercial operation, it’s vital to eliminate the prospect of food poisoning from poor hygiene and cross-contamination by keeping equipment and surfaces super-clean,” he said.Other new products include: 10-litre bottles of own-brand Essential machine dishwash and Essential machine glasswash; retail-style 500ml, pump-action bottles of its bactericidal hand soap; and a new bottle in its thick bleach range a 750ml swan-necked container.www.countryrange.co.uklast_img read more

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The search is still on for BBC One bakery family

first_imgTV production company Wall to Wall is still on the look out for a baker and their family to take part in a new programme, labelled a “living history experience” for BBC One.Wall to Wall, the makers of Edwardian Country House, Who Do You Think You Are? and New Tricks, is hoping to find a lively outgoing family, ideally with at least two children between the ages of eight and 18, to rise to the challenge of living and trading their way through 100 years of British history. The baker and their family will join other shopkeepers in a parade of shops that will be completely kitted out as they would have been in Victorian Britain – using a Victorian bread oven. Each family will then run their shop as authentically as possible in other key eras of British history including Edwardian, World War Two, 1950s, and 1970s.Anyone interested in taking part would have to relocate to the town for about eight weeks and be able to reflect on the highs and lows of their experience. Filming will begin this summer, with each programme taking around five days to film.For more information, or if you are interested in taking part, please contact Michael Fraser on 020 7241 9349, or email [email protected]last_img read more

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US show throws up bakery treats

first_imgRemember 12 March’s Stop the Week news of the US exhibition Dairy-Deli-Bake, featuring an unlikely guest speaker, former president George W Bush? Well, it continues to throw up gems. In the latest show literature, we are treated to a preview of one intriguing innovation to be showcased: salads in pastry bags. Elsewhere, we are told, visitors will be slavering over a new crossover between haute cuisine and hot dogs called, predictably enough, haute dogs. Or how about “naked ’wiches”? “Think topless and bottomless and you’ll see the latest trend in sandwich presentations,” it says. Oh, we often think along those lines lines perhaps a little too much.last_img

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Training tops topics at NAMB event

first_imgTraining and education were at the forefront of the National Association of Master Bakers’ achievements last year, outlined by chairman of the board Mike Holling at the annual conference.Holling said the NAMB’s craft seminars, supported by California Raisins, would continue, as would training courses on HACCP. He revealed that one member had contacted the NAMB to say a consultant had wanted to charge £8,000 to rewrite his HACCP, but after support from the associa-tion it had cost him just £800.The NAMB recruited 21 new members in the past year and National Craft Bakers’ Week got off to a great start, said Holling, who showed delegates a video of Yorkshire baker George Fuller teaching schoolchildren how to make gingerbread men.With the support of Nabim (the National Association of British and Irish Millers), baker Chris Beaney and others are also teaching groups of 14 teachers how to teach pupils to bake. The teachers come from IT and woodwork as well as cookery, because there is a lack of teachers for the cookery curriculum, of which bakery is now a part.Neil MacSymons ended his year as NAMB president by handing over to new president Ian Storey who has one shop in County Durham. President-elect is Clive Williams with four shops in Dorset.CEO Gill Brooks-Lonican and the board were praised by delegates for delivering “a really strong performance”. Brooks-Lonican said it was her current intention to retire in June 2011.last_img read more

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