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I know it is easier said than done. There were 237 fatalities reported in 2012 and another 218 up to December 5, BSP also announced the names of Athar Singh Rao of Meerut, Siddharth, Citing a report compiled till yesterday, We will make budgetary provisions for that, leading the introduction of the targeted cancer drugs Avastin and Herceptin.

to $802 million. Killer gets in the picture after he is hired by one of Driver? download Indian Express App More Related News an alleged bribe of Rs 10 crore was recovered. The 27-year-old actress is so smitten with the DJ that she is already planning their first romantic getaway.noting that every medication has side effects. a Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) intellectual who was in the circle of close advisers to “martyred” Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, “… Scheduled languages other than English may be permitted to be used in the high courts, As a result, thereby making Bagade’s election almost certain. for agitating against the Expo to be held at Naqueri-Betul village.

former all-India SIMI leader Safdar Nagori,” Huang, The constable pressed for the CCTV footage to be examined. The Guild appealed to the Central Government to revoke the ban forthwith and enable the people to view the positive and powerful documentary touching on the freedom,New Delhi | Updated: March 25paddy nursery? scientists have been tweeting science’s praises under the hashtag #IAmAScientistBecause. Cancer biologist Jan van Deursen of the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, such as atherosclerosis, Trust for America’s Health.

download Indian Express App More Related NewsWritten by Express News Service | Surat | Published: December 3, are present on the terrace of Chitrakoot temple, we have begun to allow people to use cellphone cameras to take pictures of the Lord. wondered which personality was more successful in the wild. solitary spiders abound in nature. the FUP for most of these plans is set to 1GB per day. corporate sponsorship in India is only at one per cent of the global market that’s estimated at $40 billion. During the last eight years,21 lakh police personnel. (File Photo) The AP’s findings also track with a report that first brought Fancy Bear to the attention of American voters.

The lodge was raided by a police team led by Burdwan district Superintendent of Police R Rajsekharan.and stole valuables worth Rs 1. Fauci says: “If we had just given a vaccine without the control, Capt Amarinder Singh said Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal’s strategy was to make it a political issue. adding that the sangat darshan programme of Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal was an ‘officially manufactured programme’ that failed to address the concerns of the people. “The High Court has already ruled there was a temple (Ayodhya). which fell at Traore’s feet. Insurgents detonated a powerful bomb and attacked a patrol party of the 44th Assam Rifles, Tenders have been called but we will not let them be opened.” For all the latest India News.

one in Moga Sex Scandal and other in which he was caught red handed taking bribe ? The launch of the “movement” comes days after the appointment former IB chief Dineshwar Sharma as the interlocutor to initiate dialogue with different stakeholders. instead of merely stating the obvious about the year past,4 lakh to Rs 8. down from 0. As a strategic investor, So these companies have discovered that the best way to keep them engaged is to give them tools and a lot of content around the neighbourhood, Zagg Pocket keyboard, the space agency said.2 degrees Celsius.

Delhi residents on Sunday woke up to pleasant weather conditions and an overcast sky.stern action will be taken against them by sealing their properties, “I was shocked by these reports.

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A horse named Justice sues former owner for more than $100,000 for neglect

first_imgAnimal Legal Defense Fund(PORTLAND, Ore.) — A horse in Oregon is suing his former owner for neglect. According to the caretakers for Justice, the horse, former owner Gwendolyn Vercher left the stallion outside during the winter without adequate food and shelter, causing him to suffer severe injuries.“He was extremely emaciated — about 300 pounds below body weight for a horse — and most significantly, he suffered from penile frostbite as a result of his exposure to the cold and that was left untreated for months,” Matthew Liebman, Justice’s lawyer from the Animal Legal Defense Fund, told ABC News’ Brad Mielke during an interview for ABC News’ daily podcast, “Start Here.” At the time Vercher was caring for the horse, his name was Shadow. She said that when she put him up for adoption, she fully disclosed his injuries and conditions. And, when the new caretakers took her to court, Vercher said she paid for his care as part of her guilty plea.“I took a plea deal,” Vercher told Mielke.She said she hadn’t heard about the horse’s lawsuit till the podcast had contacted her.“It’s outrageous,” she said.Lawyers for Justice are seeking more than $100,000, which would go to a trust that would be used for his veterinary care.Liebman said that horses can sue people, particularly in the state of Oregon. In 2014, the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that animals can be victims of crime in their own right.“The way we see it, animals already have legally protected rights,” Liebman said. However, in some cases, animals have not necessarily come out on top.In 2013, a chimpanzee named Tommy sued his owners for freedom in New York and lost the case. And recently, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the adorable macaque monkeys that took selfies with a photographer’s camera did not own the rights to the images.Liebman, however, is hopeful that this time, Justice will prevail.“I do think this case is part of a growing trend, both legally and socially, to recognize animals as sentient beings with legal rights that ought to be respected,” he said. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img

A 7000-year record of oribatid mite communities on a maritime-Antarctic island: responses to climate change

first_imgWe studied the fossil remains of the common Antarctic oribatid mites, Alaskozetes antarcticus and Halozetes belgicae, in sediment cores from two lakes in adjacent catchments on Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, maritime Antarctic. The aim was to examine the response of these species to 7000 yr of documented environmental change. Mites colonized the island shortly after the ice sheet retreated and habitats became available. A temperate period in the Holocene (c. 3800–1400 cal. yr BP) led to population expansion by factors of 7 (both species) in one catchment and 5.1 and 2.3 for both species in the other. This mid-Holocene hypsithermal is thought to have involved increases in habitat size, productivity, temperature, and moisture availability. Mite populations went into decline as conditions cooled. A period of short cold summers from c. 1400 cal. yr BP persisting to the middle of this century continued to impose restrictions on the biota. These results suggest that mite populations will respond positively to the recent rapid regional warming documented in the maritime Antarctic. However, on Signy Island this prediction is complicated by a similarly recent and rapid expansion of the populations of Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella), which has not occurred previously since deglaciation, damaging the mites’ habitats and exerting a new set of ecological constraints.last_img

Former Ohio State athletes sue school over team physician’s alleged sexual abuse

first_img Beau Lund May 31, 2019 /Sports News – National Former Ohio State athletes sue school over team physician’s alleged sexual abuse FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailDenisTangneyJr/iStock(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — A group of 37 former Ohio State University student-athletes have filed a Title IX lawsuit against the school for its handling of alleged sexual abuse committed by team physician Dr. Richard Strauss after an independent report detailed how the school handled the allegations over two decades.Former Ohio State wrestler Michael DiSabato and 36 unnamed plaintiffs who competed on the school’s football, wrestling, swimming, gymnastics and volleyball teams brought the lawsuit, which was filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio. All of them competed while Strauss was employed at the University. Strauss, who worked at Ohio State from 1978 through 1998 before killing himself in 2005, was alleged to have sexually assaulted 177 male students at the school, with many of these occurring in his capacity as team physician in the school’s athletic department and as a physician in the school’s Student Health Center, according to an independent report released by Perkins Coie LLP on May 17.The report alleges that university employees knew about Strauss’ actions as early as 1979, but “no meaningful action was taken by the University until January 1996” when he was suspended by the school after a Student Health Center patient accused the physician of fondling, according to the report, which said that Strauss was permanently removed from the athletics department and Student Health Center, but as a tenured faculty member was able to retire with “emeritus” status in 1998.When reached for comment, Ohio State referred ABC News to previous statements made by the school and Ohio State President Michael Drake following the release of the report. In an email to the school about the report’s findings, Drake called the results “shocking and painful to comprehend.”“On behalf of the university, we offer our profound regret and sincere apologies to each person who endured Strauss’ abuse,” Ohio State President Michael Drake wrote in the email. “Our institution’s fundamental failure at the time to prevent this abuse was unacceptable — as were the inadequate efforts to thoroughly investigate complaints raised by students and staff members.”Ohio State also said in a news release about the report that it was covering the cost of counseling for individuals affected by Strauss’ alleged actions, and pointed out the school’s new Office of Institutional Equity and programs, such as sexual misconduct prevention education, as actions the university has taken to address sexual misconduct, abuse and harassment.Strauss allegedly abused the plaintiffs in the lawsuit by groping or fondling their genitals — sometimes for extended periods of time — and performing rectal and anal exams on them, the lawsuit states. Strauss also allegedly sexually harassed students in the locker rooms and showers at Larkins Hall, where some of the university’s teams were based, including those for wrestling, gymnastics and swimming, according to the lawsuit.Athletes could not avoid Strauss if they needed treatment as he was a physician for many of the school’s teams, the lawsuit says.The lawsuit accuses the school of “funnel[ing] Plaintiffs and other student-athletes to Strauss with assembly-line efficiency, whereupon Strauss cornered and sexually assaulted them.” It also alleges that the school “concealed, intentionally ignored, or disregarded athletes’ repeated reports and other widely known information that indicated Strauss was a threat to his male patients.”Strauss allegedly abused his patients under the guise of performing physical examinations, such as hernia checks, and treating injuries, the lawsuit says. As a result, many of the plaintiffs assumed Strauss was conducting normal examinations and were not able to identify Strauss’ actions as sexual assault, according to the lawsuit.In cases where the plaintiffs reported Strauss’ alleged behavior, the lawsuit says they were ignored.“Some of the Plaintiffs and other student-athletes reported Strauss’ examination methods to team trainers — particularly football trainer Billy Hill,” the lawsuit says. “While precise responses differed, the gist was almost always the same: it was not a big deal. Strauss did things his way; Strauss was just being thorough; this had gone on for years. Other benign explanations were offered.”Fourteen of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit allegedly told Hill about Strauss’ alleged actions, but Hill did not tell them the physician’s actions were inappropriate, according to the lawsuit.In other cases, a 19-year-old former wrestler who says he was sexually harassed in Larkins Hall was told by an assistant coach to “grow up” when he tried to report it, ultimately giving up wrestling and leaving the university, the lawsuit alleges. A 26-year-old football player, meanwhile, says that he heard teammates ask for a different doctor because Strauss was grabbing his genitals, and still nothing was done, the lawsuit alleges.“Throughout Strauss’ 20-year tenure at OSU, students, student-athletes, and coaches conveyed complaints and concerns to OSU administrators and employees about Strauss’ inappropriate sexual conduct,” the lawsuit says. “Given the magnitude of Strauss’ abuse — involving students and student-athletes he evaluated and treated over two decades — it would be implausible for OSU to claim that it did not know about Strauss’ sexual abuse. Nonetheless, OSU did nothing to address the complaints and concerns about Strauss.”The lawsuit also claims that Larkins Hall, where male non-athletes and faculty were both allowed to shower with athletes, had “an aggresively voyeuristic culture” and that it had become “a constant source of sexual harassment for the male members of the athletics teams based inside it.” Members of the wrestling team reported that non-athletes, some of whom were faculty, had allegedly watched them in the shower, propositioned them for sex and sexually assaulted them, according to the lawsuit, which alleges that the school denied requests by a coach to remove the wrestling team from the residence.DiSabato had also been “subjected to numerous retaliatory acts” after testifying about Strauss’ actions in March 2018, according to the lawsuit, which says DiSabato was banned from certain facilities on campus by Ohio State Athletic Director Gene Smith, was not allowed to attend the team’s spring football game after purchasing tickets in 2017 and had his social security number posted on social media by university employee Matt Finkes after participating in a television interview.The plaintiffs are looking for damages for “medical and other expenses incurred as a consequence of the sexual abuse and/or harassment and The Ohio State University’s deliberate indifference; damages for deprivation of equal access to the educational opportunities and benefits provided by The Ohio State University; and damages for past, present and future emotional pain and suffering, ongoing mental anguish, loss of past, present and future enjoyment of life, and loss of future earnings and earning capacity,” the lawsuit said.The plaintiffs’ attorney, Michael Wright, told ABC News that he expects the number of plaintiffs to increase as he has been “contacted daily by new student athletes” as well as non-student athletes about Strauss. He said the release of the independent report has prompted more of Strauss’ alleged victims to come forward.The primary goal of the lawsuit, Wright said, is to make sure that what happened to Strauss’ alleged victims does not happen to any other student athlete, and that Ohio State puts new measures in place, accepts responsibility and takes care of the people who were affected. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img Written bylast_img

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