AGA to oppose ‘untested’ federal involvement at House hearing

first_imgLegal & compliance Regions: US AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 27th September 2018 | By contenteditor Email Address The American Gaming Association (AGA) will today (Thursday) tell House representatives that “no additional federal engagement is needed” in sports betting in the first Washington DC hearing on the sector since the repeal of PASPA four months ago.Sara Slane, the AGA’s senior vice-president of public affairs, will be among those to give evidence to a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing titled ‘Post-PASPA: An Examination of Sports Betting in America’.Nevada Gaming Control Board (NGCB) chair Becky Harris and academic John Kindt, a prominent opponent of gambling, will also give evidence, along with representatives from the NFL and the Sheldon Adelson-backed Coalition to Stop Internet Gambling.Interestingly, iGamingBusiness.com understands that the latter’s Jon Bruning, a former Nebraska attorney general, will argue that the Wire Act should be amended to allow for online sports betting across America.The hearing was scheduled a month after Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer released sports betting guidelines, with the support of some professional sports leagues. A joint statement released by the NBA, MLB and PGA Tour said “there is a need for consistent, nationwide integrity standards to safeguard the sports millions of fans love”.The subcommittee will consider whether further federal oversight is necessary, with states such as New Jersey, Mississippi, West Virginia and Delaware having legalised betting unilaterally since PASPA was repealed.Slane (pictured) told iGamingBusiness.com that she will tell House members that the vast majority of Americans support the right of states and tribes to decide on their own betting laws, and that “significant, effective regulatory oversight” is already in place.“My testimony will focus on conveying the extent to which the gaming industry is already a well-regulated industry from the top-down and why states and sovereign tribal nations – not the federal government – are best positioned to regulate and oversee legal sports betting markets,” she said.“Replacing an already proven regulatory regime with a non-existent and untested federal oversight apparatus would be out of step with seven in 10 Americans who think this decision should be left to each state and tribe.“The AGA is unwavering in our commitment to continue a constructive dialogue on sports betting with all stakeholders. I hope to engage in a productive discussion at the hearing with members of the subcommittee and serve as a resource for anyone considering statutory or regulatory policies to govern sports betting.”Nevada regulatory head Harris will also argue for state independence. In an NGCB statement released to iGamingBusiness.com, we were told Harris “feels very strongly that the states are in the best position to regulate legalised sports betting.”The highlight of the meeting could well be evidence given by the NFL’s Jocelyn Moore, executive vice-president of communications and public affairs for the NFL, who will give more insight into the attitude of America’s biggest sports league to the roll-out of betting across the country. A traditional opponent of gambling, the NFL has already called on a federal law to be put in place involving a “core regulatory framework” for legalised sports betting.In testimony submitted ahead of the hearing, Moore said: “The absence of a clear and enforceable set of legal standards for sports betting threatens the integrity of our nation’s professional and amateur sporting contests.”The subcommittee hearing, which will commence at 10am EST, is seen as Washington’s first opportunity to fully consider the implications of the repeal of PASPA.“My subcommittee will look at the implications of this SCOTUS ruling and talk about what it means for the integrity of sports as well as what sorts of improper or illicit activities could arise,” said subcommittee chairman Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner.“Ultimately, we want to determine whether or not a basic federal framework is necessary to guide states’ new gambling policies.”center_img Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting US gaming industry prepares for today’s first House hearing since PASPA ruling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AGA to oppose ‘untested’ federal involvement at House hearinglast_img read more

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Standard Bank Malawi Limited 2009 Annual Report

first_imgStandard Bank Malawi Limited (STNBIC.mw) listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2009 annual report.For more information about Standard Bank Malawi Limited (STNBIC.mw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Standard Bank Malawi Limited (STNBIC.mw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Standard Bank Malawi Limited (STNBIC.mw)  2009 annual report.Company ProfileThe Standard Bank of Malawi is a financial services institution in Malawi providing products and services for personal and business banking, corporate and investment banking, and Treasury and Capital Management. The company provides a wide range of products; from transactional accounts, electronic banking and short- and long-term savings accounts to vehicle and equipment finance, bancassurance, structured finance, corporate lending and foreign exchange. The Standard Bank of Malawi also provides financial services to the government of Malawi, parastatals, financial institutions and international counterparts. It is a subsidiary of Standard Group in South Africa. The organisation was previously known as the Commercial Bank of Malawi and opened its first branch in Limbe in the Blantyre District in 1970. Today, the financial institution has a national footprint with 19 branches in the major towns and cities of Malawi. Standard Bank of Malawi is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) Q32014 Interim Report

first_imgChampion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Beverages sector has released it’s 2014 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng)  2014 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileChampion Breweries Plc is an established brewery in Nigeria manufacturing Champion Lager Beer and Champ Malta as well as a selection on non-alcoholic beverages. The company also brews and packages products under contract to Nigerian Breweries Plc. The main brands in its product portfolio are Champion Lager Beer and Champ Malta. Champ Malta is a flavoured beer with a golden colour and distinct aroma. The company has undergone a number of name changes; established as South East Breweries Limited, the name changed to Cross River Breweries Limited and thereafter to Champion Breweries Limited which was later changed to Champion Breweries Plc. In 2011, Consolidated Breweries acquired a 57% equity stake in Champion Breweries which was originally held by Montgomery Ventures Inc (Panama). In 2013, Raysun Nigeria Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Heineken, purchased Consolidated Breweries and now holds a majority equity stake in Champion Breweries Plc. The company’s head office is in Akwa Ibon state, Nigeria. Champion Breweries Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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The French rugby club 4,300km from Paris

first_imgYou may never have heard of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, but there’s rugby there Saint Pierre and Miquelon is near 4,300km from Paris (edited from Google maps) The French rugby club 4,300km from ParisThe ‘playing field’ was doing well to be described as such. Strewn with stones and dotted with grazing horses, the patch in the Saint-Pierre commune needed a lot of work if it was to ever become match-ready.That was in 2007 and the would-be rugby stars on the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon had been inspired to start their own club after watching the Rugby World Cup in mainland France. Today, the small outfit has taken great strides.No matter what they do, though, they will always be a very long way from the headquarters of the Fédération Française de Rugby. Because the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon lie near the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, with their capital of Saint-Pierre some 4,300km from the outskirts of Paris.Under the sticks: SPM and Frederciton together (SPM XV Facebook)With a nod to a past of colonial expansion, the archipelago is the only chunk of the so-called ‘French North American Empire’ or ‘New France’  that is still tied to the mainland in Europe. Buoyed at the cusp of Canada, it is a small dash of France in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.“Our founding president was Joseph Serra, a rugby enthusiast who has passed away,” the incumbent president Morgan Drake tells Rugby World. “Jo had a lot of friends in the world of rugby – he was from the mainland and had played for the French military team. From the very first years of our club’s existence, he succeeded in making us travel to the south of France and to see the XV of France. We were at the Stade de France for the Grand Slam in 2010.Related: Top 14 2020-21 Season Preview“We have managed to work hard to make our land usable. We have built a mobile home which serves as a clubhouse. We have created a good relationship with the Fredericton Loyalists (from New Brunswick, Canada) with whom we play a game every year. We don’t have any competition and being the only club on the island, we train all year round for the match.“We have winter indoors because of the snow.”With the last census recording a population shy of 6000, the team have had to convince whoever they can to take an interest in the game. In the first few years the club was largely made up of citizens from mainland France. Gradually they made inroads into schools, took part in charity events, took on other sports clubs in the archipelago.Up in the air: A lineout contest (SPM XV Facebook)Soccer and ice hockey are popular in the territory. So the group have taken on running clubs and donned their skates under the SPM XV banner. As Drake proudly explains, the club even brandished an ‘erotic’ calendar one year.The last time SPM faced the Fredericton Loyalists, in 2019 – the third year in a row the clubs had met – they triumphed 49-28. The global Covid crisis has rendered a fixture in 2020 untenable, however Drake is hopeful they can plan for a June 2021 clash, with SPM likely to host. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img Related: Stade Français players found to have “lung lesions” due to Covid-19Recoiling from the pandemic, life in Saint-Pierre has mirrored that of the French mainland. Although the club president suggests there is no indication the virus is circulating their territory, the population have stuck to the rules, have masked-up and maintained a respectable distance from one another where possible.With eyes on a Fredericton rematch, Drake adds: “It will be necessary to follow the evolution of the virus and the geopolic decisions of opening up territories like Canada.”But what is it like being a member of the FFR, but being on the fringe of North America?“Our relationship with the FFR is complicated,” he begins. “Because we are far away and few in numbers… It’s politics.Politics: Former French PM Manuel Valls (far left) near Saint-Pierre, 2016 (Getty Images)“But since the election of Bernard Laporte as their president, we have manage to obtain the same endowments as (others around) the national levels. Goodies, jerseys, balls.“In the future we would like to maintain relations with Fredericton and why not meet other teams?”Related: The wild life of the Bouclier de Brennus Top 14 trophyBetween their youth, men’s and women’s players they boast around 50 members. Youngsters from 16 and up can come in and play, while the youth section covers kids from 5 to 15.It has taken time to build what SPM now have. They relish the spirit of touring and rarely get a chance to face outsiders. When they do it’s a celebration. They are proud of what they have achieved out there aside the coastal fishing grounds. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Fort Worth Episcopalians look to future while grieving loss of…

first_img Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA The congregation of All Saints’ Episcopal Church gathers for Sunday worship in Fort Worth, Texas, before the coronavirus pandemic forced the suspension of large in-person gatherings. Photo: Katie Sherrod[Episcopal News Service] The church property at 4301 Meadowbrook Drive on the east side of Fort Worth, Texas, has long been a hub of Episcopal activity, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. St. Luke’s in the Meadow, a congregation of about a hundred members, has worshipped there since 1948. Its Sunday school wing now houses Fort Worth’s diocesan offices. A thriving feeding ministry, 4Saints Food Pantry, operates from the parish hall every Friday.The congregation, the diocese and the feeding ministry will carry on, but church leaders and parishioners are preparing to say goodbye to 4301 Meadowbrook Drive. The diocese is grieving the loss of a 12-year-old court battle that likely will leave St. Luke’s in the Meadow and dozens of other diocesan properties in the hands of a breakaway group that is affiliated with the Anglican Church of North America, or ACNA.The Rev. Karen Calafat, rector of St. Luke’s in the Meadow Episcopal Church in Fort Worth, Texas, chats with a mother during the parish’s weekly Coffee on the Corner in 2019. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“The task at hand is not easy, but our sights are set on continuing to love God, each other and our neighbors,” the Rev. Karen Calafat, rector of St. Luke’s in the Meadow, told Episcopal News Service by email on Feb. 25. She politely declined a request for a phone interview, citing the “many tight deadlines we are working toward at the moment” as church leaders search for new locations.St. Luke’s in the Meadow is one of six congregations in and around Fort Worth that may need to give up their worshipping spaces after the U.S. Supreme Court on Feb. 22 declined to review the diocese’s court case. The displacements would be the latest and likely final round in a legal dispute that dates to 2008, when then-Bishop Jack Iker led a majority of the diocese’s congregations out of The Episcopal Church over doctrinal differences, particularly the breakaway group’s opposition to the ordination of women and LGBTQ clergy.Since 2008, Episcopalians who remained faithful to The Episcopal Church have reorganized the diocese as 15 congregations across 24 counties, now under the leadership of Northwest Texas Bishop Scott Mayer, who has served as Fort Worth’s provisional bishop since 2015. Mayer said in a phone interview with ENS that Episcopalians in north central Texas remain upbeat about the church’s growth in the region.“There really isn’t any question that we will continue,” Mayer said, citing examples of Fort Worth Episcopalians’ perseverance and dedication. The diocese has consistently paid its full assessment in support of the churchwide budget, he said, and church members have committed time and resources to growing new ministries that serve the community.“When this diocese reorganized 12 years ago, they made decisions initially, right off the bat, that they were going to choose living over surviving, and love over fear,” he said.The property dispute now returns to the Texas trial court judge, who will determine in the coming weeks how his ruling will be carried out. “There are still some loose ends,” Mayer said, and he declined to discuss ongoing discussions with the ACNA group, other than to say that six Episcopal congregations are preparing for the possibility of losing their worship spaces.In addition to St. Luke’s in the Meadow, those Fort Worth congregations include All Saints’ Episcopal Church-Fort Worth, St. Christopher Episcopal Church and St. Elisabeth’s & Christ the King Episcopal Church. About a two-hour drive northwest, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Wichita Falls also may need to vacate its building, as well as St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Hillsboro, which has been sharing a worship space with an ACNA congregation in the town a little over 50 miles south of Fort Worth.The diocese affiliated with The Episcopal Church estimates that more than $100 million in property would be lost in the lawsuits, though a fraction of that property is at stake in the new congregational displacements. The majority of the diocese’s church buildings have been occupied since the 2008 diocesan split by congregations now affiliated with ACNA, which also will maintain possession of Camp Crucis in Granbury, Texas.ACNA leaders praised the latest court decision in favor of the breakaway Fort Worth diocese. “Today’s decision marks a turning point for us as a diocese,” Bishop Ryan Reed said in a written statement issued Feb. 22 after the U.S. Supreme Court said it wouldn’t intervene. “After directing so many resources to this dispute, we can now put our entire focus on Gospel ministry and Kingdom work.”The Rev. Jay Atwood, canon to the ordinary of the ACNA-affiliated diocese, told ENS that no decision had yet been made about the fate of the buildings that still were being used by congregations affiliated with The Episcopal Church.The Texas court rulings apply to church buildings that predate the 2008 split and shouldn’t affect Episcopal congregations that already have established new locations after being displaced. All Saints’ Episcopal School, which has its own board of trustees and sits on a campus in Fort Worth separate from the All Saints’ church building that is claimed by the breakaway diocese, is not affected by the litigation.With the end of the litigation in sight, the diocese is in mourning this week, Mayer said. In a video message to the diocese, released Feb. 26, he spoke of the “shock and anger and grief” caused by the latest news, especially amid the ongoing disruptions caused by the pandemic and last month’s cold-weather crisis – and at a time when Episcopalians are focused on Lenten preparations for Holy Week. In the video and again in his Feb. 28 sermon in the diocese’s online worship service, Mayer offered words of encouragement.“Anytime there’s significant loss, there’s corresponding grief,” he told ENS. “We invested 12 years in this; obviously, we think it’s wrong. But in these 12 years, we’ve been busy being the church, and you won’t meet a more creative and imaginative and resilient bunch of people than you will here. There’s no loss of hope, nothing like that. This is a group that’s looking forward.”For decades, a bastion of conservative theologyThis group of Episcopalians, were they to look back, would see how far their diocese has come.The Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth was created when the growing Diocese of Dallas split in half under a plan approved by General Convention in 1982. Once numbering more than 50 congregations, the Diocese of Fort Worth was long known as one of the most conservative dioceses in The Episcopal Church, particularly for its exclusion of women from ordination.By 2006, 30 years had passed since General Convention voted in 1976 to allow women’s ordination, but opportunities to become priests still were denied to women in Fort Worth. It was one of three remaining holdout dioceses, along with the Diocese of Quincy in western Illinois and the Diocese of San Joaquin in central California.After Nevada Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori was elected as The Episcopal Church’s first female presiding bishop in June 2006, the conservative leaders of seven dioceses, including Fort Worth, sought “alternative primatial oversight” from an Anglican leader outside of The Episcopal Church. Negotiations ended in a stalemate. Theological and doctrinal tensions already had been simmering because of The Episcopal Church’s efforts to include LGBTQ Episcopalians more fully in the life of the church, including as clergy. Those tensions boiled over with General Convention’s 2003 approval of the Rt. Rev. Gene Robinson as the church’s first openly gay bishop.“Opposition to the ordination of women has been in the DNA of this diocese since it was founded out of the western half of the Diocese of Dallas in 1983,” said Katie Sherrod, a longtime Fort Worth Episcopalian who now serves as the diocese’s communications director. She told ENS that Jefferts Schori’s election, even more than the consecration of Robinson as bishop of New Hampshire, fueled the push by Iker, the Fort Worth bishop, to leave the church.In subsequent years, talk of schism over LGBTQ clergy led to lawsuits across The Episcopal Church as conservative congregations from Massachusetts to Los Angeles sought to split from their dioceses. One lawsuit involved a group of 11 breakaway groups from the Diocese of Virginia. In Central New York, a departing group reached a settlement with the diocese promising not to invite any bishops from outside The Episcopal Church until it had found a new worshipping space.Reaction to Robinson’s consecration also reverberated across the Anglican Communion, prompting the release in 2004 of the Windsor Report. The report was intended as a road map for maintaining unity between The Episcopal Church and other autonomous provinces despite differences over biblical interpretations pertaining to sexuality. It called for a moratorium on the consecration of gay clergy and bishops, as well as on blessings of same-sex unions.In June 2006, The Episcopal Church’s General Convention responded to the Windsor Report with a series of resolutions that stopped short of explicitly barring new consecrations of gay bishops. Same-gender blessings weren’t mentioned. Some conservative Anglican primates met in September and released a statement criticizing The Episcopal Church’s response as insufficient.Then in December 2006, San Joaquin became the first Episcopal diocese in which leaders voted to sever ties with The Episcopal Church. Their exit plan involved revisions to the diocese’s constitution, which required the approval of two consecutive diocesan conventions, so its leaders had to wait another year to finalize the plan.Jefferts Schori, who was invested as presiding bishop just four weeks before San Joaquin’s vote, criticized the diocesan leaders’ action. “Our task as The Episcopal Church is God’s mission of reconciling the world, and actions such as this distract and detract from that mission,” she said.Outreach by Jefferts Schori and other church leaders failed to halt the conservative push to leave the church. In September 2007, more than a dozen active and former diocesan bishops attended a meeting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to coordinate plans for developing an “Anglican union” outside of The Episcopal Church that they hoped would be recognized by other Anglican provinces.That month, leaders in the dioceses of Pittsburgh and Quincy announced plans to join their counterparts in San Joaquin in disassociating from The Episcopal Church, and on Oct. 1, 2007, Fort Worth’s Standing Committee said it, too, would ask its diocesan convention to begin the process of aligning with another Anglican province.Fort Worth Bishop Jack Iker led a majority of congregations from his diocese out of The Episcopal Church in 2008. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceJefferts Schori issued letters of warning to the bishops, including Iker, that their proposals violated The Episcopal Church’s Canons and could mean the bishops had “abandoned the Communion of this Church,” warranting disciplinary action. “It grieves me that any bishop of this church would seek to lead any of its members out of it,” she said.In her letter to Iker, Jefferts Schori wrote, “I call upon you to recede from this direction and to lead your diocese on a new course that recognizes the interdependent and hierarchical relationship between the national church and its dioceses and parishes. That relationship is at the heart of our mission, as expressed in our polity.”Iker denied he had abandoned The Episcopal Church or violated its canons. In his response, he called the presiding bishop’s letter “highly inappropriate” and “threatening.”“I must remind you that 25 years ago this month, the newly formed Diocese of Fort Worth voluntarily voted to enter into union with the General Convention of the Episcopal Church,” Iker said. “If circumstances warrant it, we can likewise, by voluntary vote, terminate that relationship.”On Nov. 17, 2007, the Fort Worth convention approved the first reading of the change to its diocesan constitution to leave the church.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori preaches during the closing Eucharist of the 18th annual Global Episcopal Mission Conference in 2013. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceBy then, Fort Worth was one of four dioceses whose leaders were in the process of splitting from The Episcopal Church. Conventions in Pittsburgh and Quincy approved their first readings of constitutional changes rejecting the church’s authority, and the San Joaquin convention finalized its plan in December 2007 after approving it a second time. The four dioceses’ leaders then moved to align themselves with the Argentina-based Anglican Province of the Southern Cone, which offered to welcome those breakaway groups “on an emergency and pastoral basis.”Fort Worth was the first to give preliminary acceptance of that offer in January 2008, an arrangement that “would afford our diocese greater self-determination than we currently have under the General Convention of The Episcopal Church,” Iker and Fort Worth’s Standing Committee said.In fall 2008, the diocesan conventions of Pittsburgh and Quincy voted the required second time to change their constitutions and leave the church. In Fort Worth, some congregations refused to join Iker in his drive toward separation. Iker supported a proposal to let those congregations become “associate” members of the Diocese of Dallas, but churchwide leaders rejected that idea, citing Canon 10, which doesn’t allow for congregations to leave one diocese to join another.On Nov. 15, 2008, Fort Worth leaders voted a final time to join members of the other three dioceses in leaving the church. When Jefferts Schori disciplined Iker by barring him from all “Episcopal, ministerial and canonical acts,” Iker responded by denying she had any authority over him. “She never has, and she never will,” he said.Jefferts Schori said The Episcopal Church grieved the breakaway groups’ departure.“We remind those former Episcopalians that the door is open if they wish to return,” she said in response to the Fort Worth vote. “We will work with Episcopalians in the Diocese of Fort Worth to elect new leadership and continue the work of the Gospel in that part of Texas.”Fort Worth diocese spends years reorganizing with churchwide supportFort Worth Episcopalians still faithful to The Episcopal Church formed a “steering committee” that at the time of the split represented an estimated 8,000 church members from at least 17 congregations.The continuing diocese, they said, “remains a constituent part of the Episcopal Church under the Constitution and Canons of the Episcopal Church and will continue to carry out the mission of the Episcopal Church, which is to reconcile the world to God though Jesus Christ. We will welcome home any who wish to return to the Episcopal Church.”To fill the void in diocesan leadership, Jeffers Schori convened a special meeting of the diocesan convention on Feb. 7, 2009, at Fort Worth’s Trinity Episcopal Church, during which Kentucky Bishop Ted Gulick was elected provisional bishop.The exodus of Iker and other conservative leaders finally opened the door to women’s ordination in the diocese, decades after women had been ordained in other dioceses. A female priest from Madison, Wisconsin, made headlines for presiding at the Eucharist in the diocese, and on Nov. 14, 2009, the diocese ordained the Rev. Susan Slaughter as its first female priest in a ceremony at St. Luke’s in the Meadow, where she began serving as rector.A group from the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth at the Tarrant County Gay Pride Parade in Fort Worth, Texas, on Oct. 5, 2019. Photo: Diocese of Fort WorthThe breakaway group, however, still occupied most of the diocese’s church buildings and saw itself as the true Episcopal diocese. Its attorney asked the remaining Episcopalians to stop using the diocesan logo in its correspondence and to stop calling itself “The Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.” The Fort Worth diocese led by Iker, after temporarily aligning with the Anglican Province of the Southern Cone, soon became a founding member of the Anglican Church in North America. ACNA, however, has yet to realize its goal of recognition as a member province of the Anglican Communion. Iker retired at the end of 2019.The Episcopal Church and the Fort Worth diocese affiliated with it were preparing a legal strategy of their own.On March 3, Gulick and the continuing diocese’s Standing Committee wrote to Iker requesting a “peaceful and orderly transfer of property and other assets” and asked the breakaway group to stop using the diocesan logo. A month later, the diocese filed its lawsuit asking the court to compel Iker’s group to return church property to The Episcopal Church.“This litigation is designed to move quickly to confirm the historical right of Episcopalians to lead the diocese as stewards of its property as we in humility and hope continue the mission of the Episcopal Church here,” Gulick said in a pastoral letter to the diocese’s faith communities. “We deeply regret that the decisions and actions of former diocesan leaders have brought us to this difficult moment.”Alongside the legal efforts, The Episcopal Church was helping the local steering committee to reorganize the Fort Worth diocese. Its administrative records were in disarray after the split, and church leaders worked to determine which Episcopalians remained with the church, reconstruct membership lists and congregations, identify faithful clergy and find new places to worship for the congregations displaced by Iker’s group.Some congregations began worshipping in storefront churches. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Arlington found a new home in a theater. The diocese planted a new congregation in 2015 in Decatur, calling it the Episcopal Church of Wise County.After Gulick, the Rt. Rev. C. Wallis Ohl took over as provisional bishop in late 2009, followed by the Rt. Rev. Rayford High in 2012 and now Mayer. Their tenures coincided with an ongoing legal battle that initially was leaning in the diocese’s favor. In January 2011, Tarrant County District Court Judge John Chupp cited the hierarchical nature of The Episcopal Church in ruling that all property taken by Iker’s group must be returned to the continuing diocese affiliated with The Episcopal Church.“In the event of a dispute among its members, a constituent part of a hierarchical church consists of those individuals remaining loyal to the hierarchical church body,” Chupp said. He gave the breakaway diocese 60 days to comply.On appeal, however, the Texas Supreme Court sent the case back to Chupp, ordering him to decide it on “neutral principles of law,” essentially throwing out the argument that The Episcopal Church’s hierarchical structure was enough to protect diocesan properties. Chupp returned a new ruling in 2015, this time siding with the breakaway group. An appeals court reversed Chupp, but the Texas Supreme Court reinstated his ruling in May 2020. The dispute over the diocesan name and logo is expected to be among the details to be addressed when the case returns to Chupp in the coming weeks.Bishop Scott Mayer is bishop provisional of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth. Photo courtesy of the diocese“You come to this current crisis equipped with knowledge, not only of your own gifts but of God’s unconditional love,” Mayer told the diocese in his video message last week. “Episcopalians in north central Texas may not be rich in buildings, but we are rich in talents, generously offered to the larger good. We are rich in generous, faith-filled lives.”Other dioceses have won more favorable legal outcomes, from California to Pennsylvania. In such cases, the dioceses affiliated with The Episcopal Church retained or regained possession of their church properties. “We have prevailed in a high percentage of cases all over the country,” Mayer told ENS, “whether it be a diocese or a congregation. But that is not the case in the state of Texas.”He acknowledged the diocese had faced long odds in asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case. After the court declined last week, the news sparked an outpouring of support for Mayer’s diocese from across The Episcopal Church, including from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.“We very much feel the support and the prayers of Episcopalians around the country,” Mayer said, “including Bishop Curry and his staff and [House of Deputies President] Gay Jennings and leaders and friends all over the church. We know we’re being lifted up in prayer, and we know we’re not alone.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Fort Worth Episcopalians look to future while grieving loss of 12-year church-property battle Women’s Ministry New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis LGBTQ, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By David PaulsenPosted Mar 1, 2021 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Oil Futures Hold Steady Near 9 Month High

first_img Facebook Twitter SHARE Oil Futures Hold Steady Near 9 Month High Oil futures held steady but near nine-month highs Monday, erasing or trimming earlier gains on expectations Iraq’s main oil-producing areas will remain insulated from the sectarian violence sweeping the north of the country as Sunni militants battle the Iraqi government. July crude oil   fell a penny to close at $106.90 a barrel on Nymex after earlier trading above $107 a barrel, ending a three-session winning streak. Prices last week jumped 4.1%, the largest weekly percentage gain since the week ended Dec. 6. They had seen their highest settlement since Sept. 18, 2013. The August contract for Brent crude, the European benchmark, fell 8 cents, or 0.1%, to $112.86 a barrel, following gains of roughly 4% last week. Facebook Twitter “Global oil prices have risen by a few dollars but, at around $113 for Brent, they are still close to the average of $110 since the “Arab Spring” began in 2011,” said Julian Jessop, economist at Capital Economics in London. “This makes sense. The immediate risks from the fighting in the north of Iraq are small, as the oil industry is concentrated in the south and in the Kurdish region. Indeed, help from Iran in resolving the Iraq crisis might clear the way for a further easing of Western sanctions on Iran’s energy exports,” he said.center_img Previous articleMore Delays for Indiana Spraying and SidedressingNext articleCrop Condition Ratings What Traders Expected Gary Truitt SHARE By Gary Truitt – Jun 16, 2014 Home Energy Oil Futures Hold Steady Near 9 Month Highlast_img read more

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RFA Releases Report to Debunk Food v Fuel

first_img The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) has released a new report today in an effort to “debunk” what they call the “fictional” food versus fuel debate. The report finds that while corn prices have dropped dramatically over the past two years, retail food prices of key foods including eggs, beef, poultry and pork have remained steady or continue to increase. The report concludes, “… fluctuations in corn prices do not significantly affect consumer food prices.”The report examined a number of factors that contribute to food prices including the cost of food production, pointing to Citibank’s Sterling Smith who stated, “Corn prices may have come down 50% (from their highs), but that doesn’t mean a box of corn flakes will fall 50% in price. Much of the price of food comes from the processing and movement of food…” Additionally, the report also highlighted the role of crude oil in retail food prices, finding that “…every step in the food supply chain is significantly affected by energy costs—especially crude oil.”The report also compared corn prices to the price of dairy products, pork products, beef products poultry products and egg products from January 2007 – July 2014. Report findings include:Retail prices for key dairy items like milk and cheese have been largely unresponsive to changes in corn prices. In fact, since January 2011, milk and cheese prices have been negatively correlated to corn prices, meaning retail milk and cheese prices have tended to move in the opposite direction of movements in corn prices.Retail prices for items (like chicken legs, frozen whole turkey, fresh whole chicken) have risen steadily and smoothly since 2007. Wide swings in corn prices did not interrupt or affect the gradual trend toward higher prices for these items.Retail prices for pork products have not shown any meaningful relationship to corn prices over the past seven years. It is well documented that the recent acceleration in pork and bacon prices has been driven by piglet casualties resulting from Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv). These retail price increases have occurred at a time when corn prices have been plunging.Retail ground beef prices have steadily and smoothly trended higher over the past seven years, showing no obvious response to wide swings in corn prices.“The food vs. fuel folks screamed to high heaven when the price of corn rose during the drought and immediately blamed high corn prices and ethanol for food price increases,” said Bob Dinneen, RFA president and CEO. “However, these same critics remain suspiciously quiet now that corn prices have dropped, but retail food prices aren’t dropping along with them. The food vs. fuel argument is just another misguided attack on biofuels and the Renewable Fuel Standard, which is reducing foreign oil dependence, lowering gas prices for consumers, and revitalizing rural America.”Source: www.domesticfuel.com RFA Releases Report to Debunk Food v Fuel SHARE Facebook Twitter Home Energy RFA Releases Report to Debunk Food v Fuel Previous articleIndiana Cash Rent Up $3 Per Acre in 2014Next articleMorning Outlook Andy Eubank SHARE Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Sep 8, 2014 last_img read more

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TCU’s diversity falls middle of the road compared to peer institutions

first_imgTCU Values and Ventures competition grows to largest in school history Linkedin Rachel Tiedehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/rachel-tiede/ Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history printTCU received a record number of applications for the Class of 2020– 19,972. This year’s student body sits at about 71 percent white. Hispanic/Latino students make up the second largest category at 12 percent, according to TCU Factbook.“I think we have a responsibility, a moral responsibility, to provide access to higher education for those who have historically been shut out, or who’ve had less of an opportunity,” said Heath Einstein, the interim dean of admission. This year’s freshman class is the most diverse class in school history. The TCU Factbook says about 48 percent of white students were accepted, compared to about 14 percent of African-Americans and about 24 percent of Hispanic/Latino students.However, those percentages are based on the number of applications submitted, but not necessarily completed, Einstein said.“Students of color tend to complete their applications at a slightly lower rate than non-students of color,” he said.This places TCU’s diversity level for the freshmen Class of 2016 on the higher end compared to what Chancellor Victor Boschini considers TCU’s peer institutions. Tulane University’s incoming class was about 76 percent white, Baylor University’s was about 66 percent and Vanderbilt University’s was about 47 percent.Southern Methodist University doesn’t have statistics for the most recent incoming class, or its 2016 overall diversity statistics. But its overall diversity in 2015 sat at 74 percent white, compared with TCU’s 2015 level of 72 percent. Einstein also said academic preparation is an important factor.“You can’t just look at the acceptance rate. It’s also what academic experiences are they bringing to demonstrate they are prepared to meet academic success here,” he said.Enrollment rates are slightly lower for students of color as well.Of the 394 African-American students accepted, 88 enrolled. Of the 1,020 Hispanic students accepted, 251 enrolled. By comparison, 5,157 white students were accepted and 1,376 enrolled. Linkedin Twitter Facebook Rachel Tiedehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/rachel-tiede/ Rachel Tiede ReddIt Students walk past the founders statue on their way to class March 30, 2017. Website| + posts center_img Rachel is a senior multimedia reporter for TCU360.com. She creates in-depth packages and stories for the website, TCU News Now, and the Skiff.Rachel is also on the TCU Triathlon Team, a member of Eta Iota Sigma, the Order of Omega, and the John V. Roach Honors College. She enjoys exploring Fort Worth–seeing plays, trying new restaurants, and cheering on the Horned Frogs! Twitter Rachel Tiedehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/rachel-tiede/ Rachel Tiedehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/rachel-tiede/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 TCU Office of Admission to add new programs to attract and keep diversity ReddIt Class of 2020 admission statisticsCreate your own infographicsPart of the answer may be income and the school’s reputation, said Darron Turner, the newly appointed chief inclusion officer and Title IX coordinator.“Part of that may be just gaining the reputation of the school in the communities they come from,” he said. “Part of that is we have to do a better job also of outreach.”Timeka Gordon, the director of Inclusiveness and Intercultural Services, agrees.“If we fail to go into diverse communities, then we’ve already lost, because it’s not about us telling them to come here, to get to know us so we can prove we are accepting and welcoming,” she said. “We have to get our tails out there and into the community to say we’re not afraid.”Beyond AdmissionGordon also heads the Community Scholar program–a full-ride scholarship program recruiting from 11 DFW schools.The program started with 12 students in 2000 as part of then-Chancellor Michael Ferrari’s effort to bring diversity to campus. This past fall, 44 first-year students won Community Scholar awards. The program also provides resources and requirements to help the scholars–many first generation college students–transition to college, such as a GPA and community service requirement, cultural events, academic workshops, and professional development seminars. They also must join a student organization and become an officer or leader by their junior year.“They have a lot of requirements so that we’re making sure they are developing into great, ethical leaders, that are valued beyond just a numerical number,” Gordon said. “We want to expose them to so much so that when they leave here, they are actively engaged citizens.”In this February 10, 2017 interview, Lea Sandoval speaks with TCU360 about her experience in Community Scholars. She said she enjoys talking to people with different points of view.Lea Sandoval, a junior middle school math education major, is a Community Scholar. She said without her award, attending TCU would not have been possible.“Tuition is kind of expensive, just a little bit, you know?” she said.Sandoval is also a first generation college student.“There is a good chunk in Community Scholars that’s first generation, so we can connect on that and bond over that, and help each other out,” she said.Gordon said there is a misconception that the Community Scholars program is the sole reason for diversity on campus.“We have students of color, students of color that are not Community Scholars and they should not be forgotten because they are valuable assets to this campus,” she said. “And then I laugh too because if Community Scholars is what makes TCU diverse, then have you not looked at our football and basketball teams?”Kamry Henson walks to class Tuesday, March 28, 2017. Henson said it can be hard for students to meet other students of color if they are not enrolled in the Community Scholars program.Kamry Henson falls into that category. The sophomore supply and value chain management major is a student of color but is neither an athlete nor a Community Scholar.She hangs out with those in the Community Scholar program anyway and attends all their events because she said it’s hard to meet minority students if you aren’t in the program.“The freshmen that were Community Scholars just assumed I was a Community Scholar because I was a minority hanging out with them,” Henson said.She added that people have assumed she attends TCU on an athletic scholarship, or as an international student.“I found my people, but we’re almost our own community,” Henson said. “It’s just another world, almost. It’s really disassociated.”Gordon adds that the Community Scholars program itself is very diverse, including black, Hispanic, Asian, white and international students. But she stressed that diversity isn’t just about race, either.“Even within the context of 150 Community Scholars that are right now on this campus, I have students that are undocumented, refugees, that are LGBTQIA, that are from single parent households who have lost a parent and in so many ways, that’s diversity too,” she said.Sandoval said that’s one of her favorite parts about the program.“I really enjoy being around people with different perspectives and learning how people view things,” she said. “So I really enjoy the diversity our program has.”TCU also has a new diversity-focused program.The recently approved Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES) program offers students a chance to earn a major, minor or emphasis in classes that pull from many interdisciplinary programs, including:African-American and Africana StudiesAsian Studies, Latina/o StudiesMiddle East Studies, Jewish StudiesBritish & Colonial/Post-Colonial StudiesWomen and Gender StudiesUrban StudiesDiscovering Global Citizenship Quality Enhancement Plan“They’re still doing some organization piece, but someone will start teaching classes in the fall,” Turner said. “You have faculty and staff that’s working hard to get the message out, along with students who pushed for this very hard.”Mirroring the Student BodyIn the fall of 2016, about 84 percent of TCU’s faculty was white, according to the TCU Factbook. Turner said the school needs diversity among its faculty and staff, and that when potential students visit, that matters to them.“They want to know there are faculty and staff that look like them on campus,” he said. “So along with recruiting–the admissions department going out to recruit– I think we also as a university have to look at what we’re doing to make sure this climate is a climate in which people want to be in, any student we want to recruit.”Because, he said, the faculty and staff should “mirror” the student body.“Our employees have to mirror what we’re doing with our students,” Turner said. “We have to make sure that we are challenging students in ways in which they are not used to being challenged. And some of that is going to be visual, some of that is going to be information, some of that is going to be how you interact and what you know about cultures.”Einstein said he too thinks all diversity is important, whether that’s racial, geographic or socioeconomic.“We have to be exposed to people whose worldviews are different from ours,” he said. “That’s how we grow.”But Einstein said diversity should not come at the cost of other university goals.“We want as diverse a community as possible, so long as we’re not adversely impacting other important strategic objectives, most notably: academic profile of the institution,” he said.Both Einstein and Turner said there aren’t any diversity percentage “goal figures.” They both said, “You’ll know it when you see it.”“That may be 30 percent, that may be 40 percent, that may be less than that,” Turner said. “It’s just, you have a number that’s going to make sure we all experience each other.” Previous articleA&J Podcast – April 4, 2017Next articleThe Skiff: April 6, 2017 Rachel Tiede RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Is TCU’s firework obsession because of Boschini? ‘It doesn’t hurt.’ TCU, UNTHSC students highlight partnership of medicine and nutritionlast_img read more

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Delhi High Court Stays GNCTD Order Suspending Electric Vehicle Subsidy For Tata Nexon EV

first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi High Court Stays GNCTD Order Suspending Electric Vehicle Subsidy For Tata Nexon EV Nupur Thapliyal13 March 2021 10:48 PMShare This – xThe Delhi High Court on Wednesday stayed the operation of an order dated 1st March 2021 passed by Deputy Commissioner of GNCTD directing suspension of listing of Tata Nexon EV as an eligible Electric Vehicle from the list of eligible models from availing subsidy under Delhi Electric Vehicle Policy. Justice Sanjeev Sachdeva granted the interim relief on a writ petition filed by Tata Motors…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Delhi High Court on Wednesday stayed the operation of an order dated 1st March 2021 passed by Deputy Commissioner of GNCTD directing suspension of listing of Tata Nexon EV as an eligible Electric Vehicle from the list of eligible models from availing subsidy under Delhi Electric Vehicle Policy. Justice Sanjeev Sachdeva granted the interim relief on a writ petition filed by Tata Motors Ltd. challenging the said impugned order. Delhi Electric Vehicles Policy 2020 was notified by the Government of NCT of Delhi. According to clause 4.6 of the policy, it has been provided that the purchase incentive shall be applicable only to electric four wheelers with advanced batteries listed as being eligible under Faster Adoption and Manufacturing of Electric Vehicles in India Phase II, after fulfilling eligibility and testing conditions. BackgroundA complaint was made by an individual stating that the Tata Nexon EV model never provided a range of more than 200 kms in a single charge, running contrary to its specification providing 312 kms per charge. It was the case of the petitioner that the criteria mentioned under Central Motor Vehicles Rules, 1989 is 140 kms per charge and therefore the vehicle meets the requirement of the said rules. In furtherance of this, a certificate of compliance was issued by ARAI on 14.01.2020.  However, the impugned order recorded that the stipulation of 140 kms would stand satisfied only when a vehicle claiming performance range of 140 kms actually delivers performance of 140 kms, subject to minor variation. Moreover, it was observed that such an approach would lead to absurd result and would also make a complete mockery of the whole Subsidy Policy. Observing that the Government cannot support sale of vehicles of a company which is not honest with its representations, the GNCTD constituted a committee to verify the claim of complainant and assertions made by Tata Motors Ltd and to make final call in the matter. The said committee involved representatives from Transport Department, DIMTS, Tata Motors Ltd. and any reputed organization. Along with this, the said order also observed that it was necessary/imperative to suspend the listing of the subject EV i.e. Tata Nexon EV as an eligible EV from the list of eligible models for availing subsidy under the Delhi EV Policy. Observation of Court Noting that there was no material on record to show that the petitioner company contravened any conditions of Delhi EV Policy, the Court observed: “The impugned order rather constitutes a Committee of representatives from four organizations including the petitioner to verify the claim of the claimants as well as the assertion made by the petitioner. This goes on to show that there was no concrete material before the officer, when the impugned order was passed. The impugned order has been passed without any verification.” While observing that the officer may be empowered to carry out the inspection of vehicle, the Court however opined that such inspection cannot replace a test carried out by the statutory test agency following the parameters of CMVR. Therefore, the Court observed that the decision of such an inspection Committee cannot override the decision of the Statutory Testing Agency. The Court also went ahead to observe that the impugned order was passed without there being any material to substantiate the allegations and therefore is contrary to the policy of the government and rather defeats the very purpose of the scheme of the Policy of Faster Adoption and Manufacturing of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles. Admitting that the vehicle of the petitioner meets the criteria laid down by the policy and has also been so certified by the Statutory Testing Agency ARAI, the Court thus stayed the operation of impugned order directing suspension of Tata Nexon EV as an eligible EV from the list of eligible models from availing subsidy under Delhi EV Policy. The Court granted 2 weeks time for filing reply in the matter and a further 2 weeks time in order to file rejoinder. The matter will now be heard in 13th April 2021.Tata Motors Ltd. was represented by Senior Counsels Dr. Abhishek Manu Singhvi, Mr. Rajiv Nayar and Mr. Gopal Jain; briefed by the team of Karanjawala & Co. comprising of Ms. Nandini Gore, (Sr. Partner), Natasha Sahrawat (Principal Associate) and Raghvendra Pratap Singh (Associate).Click Here To Download Order[Read Order]Next Storylast_img read more

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A horse named Justice sues former owner for more than $100,000 for neglect

first_imgAnimal Legal Defense Fund(PORTLAND, Ore.) — A horse in Oregon is suing his former owner for neglect. According to the caretakers for Justice, the horse, former owner Gwendolyn Vercher left the stallion outside during the winter without adequate food and shelter, causing him to suffer severe injuries.“He was extremely emaciated — about 300 pounds below body weight for a horse — and most significantly, he suffered from penile frostbite as a result of his exposure to the cold and that was left untreated for months,” Matthew Liebman, Justice’s lawyer from the Animal Legal Defense Fund, told ABC News’ Brad Mielke during an interview for ABC News’ daily podcast, “Start Here.” At the time Vercher was caring for the horse, his name was Shadow. She said that when she put him up for adoption, she fully disclosed his injuries and conditions. And, when the new caretakers took her to court, Vercher said she paid for his care as part of her guilty plea.“I took a plea deal,” Vercher told Mielke.She said she hadn’t heard about the horse’s lawsuit till the podcast had contacted her.“It’s outrageous,” she said.Lawyers for Justice are seeking more than $100,000, which would go to a trust that would be used for his veterinary care.Liebman said that horses can sue people, particularly in the state of Oregon. In 2014, the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that animals can be victims of crime in their own right.“The way we see it, animals already have legally protected rights,” Liebman said. However, in some cases, animals have not necessarily come out on top.In 2013, a chimpanzee named Tommy sued his owners for freedom in New York and lost the case. And recently, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the adorable macaque monkeys that took selfies with a photographer’s camera did not own the rights to the images.Liebman, however, is hopeful that this time, Justice will prevail.“I do think this case is part of a growing trend, both legally and socially, to recognize animals as sentient beings with legal rights that ought to be respected,” he said. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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