SBTech Masters @ICE 2019

first_img Meet the key people behind the brand @ICE when they will lead short presentation sessions on the gaming industry’s hottest topics. Sports betting Email Address Meet the key people behind the brand @ICE when they will lead short presentation sessions on the gaming industry’s hottest topics.Visit SBTech at stand S3-110.Find out more info here: http://www.sbtech.com/masters/ Tags: Mobile Online Gambling AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter SBTech Masters @ICE 2019center_img 23rd January 2019 | By Louella Hughes  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:01Loaded: 0.00%0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -2:01 Share1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window. This video is either unavailable or not supported in this browser Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_SRC_NOT_SUPPORTED Technical details : The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported. Topics: Sports betting Session ID: 2021-06-20:d9b1bd842b60883c5c47fa1b Player Element ID: vjs_video_3 OK Close Modal DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

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Dojo Madness rebrands as Bayes Holding following B2B pivot

first_imgCasino & games Topics: Casino & games Esports Tech & innovation Video gaming Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Esports data specialist Dojo Madness has announced that it will pivot to focus exclusively on B2B activities, which in turn will see the business rebranded as Bayes Holding.While the business originally operated a B2C analytics solution for esports players, allowing them to assess and refine their gameplay, it has made the shift to pursue what it sees as much greater opportunities, created by offering two core products to corporate partners.There is esports analytics arm Shadow, which works with professional teams, coaches, analysts and players, and Bayes Esports Solutions, a joint venture with Sportradar to develop data solutions for customers such as betting operators, esports broadcasters and media organisations.“With our two business units, we have been able to build leading positions in the global market for esports data and analysis,” founder and managing director Jens Hilgers said. “Both divisions will receive our full focus now – also to maximise synergies.”Bayes Esports Solutions managing director Martin Dachselt explained that there is currently a dearth of widely available data collected from professional esports competitions. This has resulted in Bayes developing BEDEX, an independent marketplace for in-game data, as it looks to ensure that it expands the range available to a wider number of partners, thus helping expand betting and media coverage. BEDEX acts as a central hub for data collected from competitions covering a range of tiles and tournaments, including Modern Times Group’s Electronic Sports League (ESL) and DreamHack events, and Riot Games’ League of Legends World and European championships.Moving forward, the B2B-focused Bayes will ramp up investment in BEDEX and other technological solutions to further strengthen the esports ecosystem.“I am convinced that with our solution, we can solve some of the underlying problems of esports,” Dachselt said. “Our neutral platform also offers smaller tournament organisers the opportunity to distribute and monetise their esports data.” Email Address AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwittercenter_img Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Video Gaming Esports data specialist Dojo Madness has announced that it will pivot to focus exclusively on B2B activities, which in turn will see the business rebranded as Bayes Holding. Dojo Madness rebrands as Bayes Holding following B2B pivot 31st January 2020 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

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Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) 2008 Annual Report

first_imgFlour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Food sector has released it’s 2008 annual report.For more information about Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng)  2008 annual report.Company ProfileFlour Mills Nigeria Plc is a flour milling company in Nigeria with business interests in food production, packaging, agricultural industries, port operations and logistics and real estate. The company manufactures and sells past, noodle, edible oil and refined sugar as well as livestock feeds; supplies fertiliser; manufactures and markets laminated woven polypropylene sacks and flexible packing material; and grows and processes sugar cane, oil palm, fresh tropical fruit, poultry and cassava. Business interests in ports operations and logistics include operating Terminal A and B at the Apapa port and offering customs clearing, forwarding and shipping agents and logistics services. Flour Mills Nigeria Plc owns and manages real estate in Nigeria. The company is a subsidiary of Excelsior Shipping Company Limited. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Flour Mills Nigeria Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Stanbic IBTC Bank (IBTC.ng) 2016 Annual Report

first_imgStanbic IBTC Bank (IBTC.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2016 annual report.For more information about Stanbic IBTC Bank (IBTC.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Stanbic IBTC Bank (IBTC.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Stanbic IBTC Bank (IBTC.ng)  2016 annual report.Company ProfileStanbic IBTC Plc is a financial services company in Nigeria offering banking products and services for the retail, corporate, investment and wealth management sectors. The Personal and Corporate Banking division provides a full-service offering ranging from transactional accounts to residential accommodation loans, vehicle and equipment finance and instalment finance. The Corporate and Investment Banking division offers products and services for foreign exchange, fixed income and equity trading as well as transactional banking, corporate and property lending and custodial and trade finance services. The Wealth Management division provides services for investment management, pension management, portfolio management, unit trust/fund management and trusteeship services. Stanbic IBTC Holdings Plc undertakes venture capital projects and private equity investments; acts as an executor and trustee of wills and trusts; and provides agency, insurance brokerage and stockbroking services. Founded in 1989, Stanbic IBTC Holdings Plc is a subsidiary of Stanbic Africa Holdings Limited. Its company head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Stanbic IBTC Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Smart Products Nigeria Plc (SMURFT.ng) 2017 Abridged Report

first_imgSmart Products Nigeria Plc (SMURFT.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2017 abridged results.For more information about Smart Products Nigeria Plc (SMURFT.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Smart Products Nigeria Plc (SMURFT.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Smart Products Nigeria Plc (SMURFT.ng)  2017 abridged results.Company ProfileSmart Products Nigeria Plc relies on rental income and profit on investment. It was incorporated on 11 January 1966 as Associated Press Limited was, a private limited liability company and commenced operation as a legal entity immediately. The name was changed to Smurfit Print Nigeria Limited in 1987 and was subsequently converted to a public limited liability company in 1991 which made it change its name to Smurfit Print Nigeria Plc. The name was changed to Smart Products Nigeria Plc on 25 September, 2005. Smart Products Nigeria Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) HY2017 Interim Report

first_imgPress Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2017 interim results for the half year.For more information about Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw)  2017 interim results for the half year.Company ProfilePress Corporation Limited is the largest holding company in Malawi; with vested interests in real estate, energy, food and beverages, consumer goods, financial services and telecommunications. The highly diversified company has stakes in 13 companies in Malawi made up of 8 subsidiaries, 4 joint ventures and one associate. Well-known brands in its portfolio include: National Bank of Malawi in the financial services sector, Malawi Telecommunications Limited and Telekom Networks Limited in the telecommunication sector, Ethanol Company Limited and Presscane Limited in the energy sector, People’s Trading Centre Limited in the consumer goods sector, Press Properties Limited and Manzini Limited in the property investment and development sector, and The Foods Company in the food manufacturing sector. Press Corporation Limited is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Episcopalians join thousands on pilgrimage to historical site at former…

first_img Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC By Pat McCaughanPosted May 1, 2019 Ethnic Ministries, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Racial Justice & Reconciliation Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopalians joined worshippers at an April 27 interfaith service, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first pilgrimage to Manzanar internment camp, one of 10 where 120,000 Japanese Americans were held during World War II. Photo: Mel Soriano[Episcopal News Service – Lone Pine, California] Episcopalians from the Diocese of Los Angeles were among thousands who journeyed April 27 to Manzanar National Historic Site, one of the 10 internment camps where nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans were held during World War II, an injustice that speakers said must “never happen again.”In blistering desert heat and in the shadow of the snow-capped Sierra Nevada mountains, the Kyodo Taiko drummers from the University of California, Los Angeles, opened the festivities to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first pilgrimage to the former war relocation center in 1969. The day’s events also included stops at the visitor’s center, the museum and a re-creation of the rustic wooden barracks that had housed four families each.During an interfaith service, Buddhist, Christian, Muslim and Shinto worshippers laid flowers at the iconic Manzanar cemetery monument, where some detainees are buried.A crowd estimated at about 2,000 listened to speakers who included representatives of the Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Reservation and the National Park Service, local activists, politicians, community organizers and Tomochika Uyama, the Japanese consul general in San Francisco.Nihad Awad, co-founder of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, thanked the Japanese American community for its support in difficult times and told the gathering that the injustices leveled against Japanese Americans must never be permitted to happen again.After teaching his children about the mass incarcerations of Japanese Americans during the war, they feared the same fate amid growing anti-Muslim sentiment in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, Awad said – so much so that his 10-year-old daughter “packed a suitcase and was ready to be picked up by the federal government.”“CAIR and a lot of civil rights organizations are working hard each day to ensure that this will never happen to her or any children in America,” he said to cheers and applause.Glenn Nishibayashi, in front of the iconic monument marking the cemetery at the former relocation center: Photo: Kathy NishibayashiAwad’s story felt very personal for Glenn Nishibayashi, a member of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, a historically Japanese American congregation in Los Angeles. His mother, Frances Kako, was 16 when she and her family were sent to the camp in Heart Mountain, Wyoming.Kako’s family ran a business that traded goods between the U.S. and Japan, but after the Dec. 7, 1941, attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor, “they had to shut down the business; they lost everything,” Nishibayashi told Episcopal News Service.Nishibayashi, 62, a retired financial planner, was among several dozen Episcopalians from the Los Angeles diocese who made the 220-mile bus trip to the camp to commemorate the anniversary.“To think, how far we still have to go,” he said. “I realized that we are not much better than we were 75 years ago. It feels like we’re heading backwards these days. It reminds me that we have to be vigilant about fighting racism and xenophobia. While it was in the past, it’s also in the present.”Nishibayashi and other children of camp survivors say their parents rarely, if ever, discussed those experiences. “It was a dark time for them, and they really didn’t want to share about it.“Essentially, they were in prison when they had done nothing wrong,” he said. “It wasn’t something they could do anything about. It was a shameful experience for them, even though it wasn’t their fault.”His son Kendall’s search for answers led them to Heart Mountain and the discovery of photos of Nishibayashi’s grandfather and his mother’s speech as valedictorian of the first high school graduating class at the camp. Published in the Heart Mountain Sentinel at the time, she told some 240 classmates, “we face the future with faith in the U.S.”Although forced to leave behind all they held dear, Kako called it “a tribute to American democracy … that we have been able to pick up so quickly the strings that we dropped, and that we, as a body, are privileged today to take part in this graduation ceremony.“We, as the graduating class have two choices before us today,” Kako wrote. “We can remain passive and live in the memory of the things we loved and knew back on the Pacific Coast. Or else we can stand strong and erect and look straight into the future.”She charged the group to “look forward with a faith in democracy that is shining and strong, for we know that the real America has a big and understanding heart.”Still, Nishibayashi said, his mother struggled with depression most of her adult life, he believes, because of her camp experiences.His father, Masaru Nishibayashi, was 18 when his family was sent to the camp in Jerome, Arkansas, Nishibayashi said. “They dressed in their Sunday best,” he said. “They did not resist. My father told me that ‘we were silent. No one spoke out or spoke up for us. We knew we were alone.’” His father’s family members also lost their business, which included renting Asian artifacts and props to Hollywood film studios.Masuru Nishibayashi served as a translator for U.S. Army military intelligence under Gen. Douglas McArthur, he said. Although detained, he was granted a special pass to come and go from the camp, a card that Nishibayashi still possesses. After the war, his father earned a doctorate in chemistry and became a research chemist.St. Mary’s, where his parents met and married, still bears witness to the past.A stained-glass window depicts the shields of the dioceses where the 10 internment camps were located. At the top of the window is the Episcopal Church shield; they are connected by a depiction of barbed wire.Near the baptismal font is a plaque, listing names of those who served in World War II, including members of the famed 442nd unit. Considered to be the most decorated unit in U.S. military history, its members were made up almost entirely of second-generation Japanese Americans, who fought while many of their family members were in camps.“My father’s name is on that plaque, and I show it to people when they come to St. Mary’s,” Nishibayashi said. Also posted in the church are copies of Executive Order 9066, signed in 1942 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorizing creation of the camps, and of a “reparations letter” that decades later accompanied $20,000 to survivors.Nishibayashi laughed. “It’s part of the family lore that my grandmother died on the day (President) Reagan signed that act. We call it her last act of defiance, as if she were saying, ‘I’m going to live long enough so you have to say sorry to me.’”A re-creation of wooden barracks depicts the rustic conditions under which detainees lived, with no heat or running water. Photo: Kathy NishibayashiSharon Matsushige Crandall, 53, also was on the bus trip. For her, the act of standing on this earth where Japanese Americans once were held reduced the sting of past shame connected with their detention and helped alleviate present challenges of feeling caught between cultures.Crandall also noted the sea of Americans of Asian, African, Latino and European descent, of all ages and genders, who attended the commemoration. “It felt so good to see such a diverse group of people there,” she said. “Years ago, the only people that would even care about something like that were other Japanese people.”“It was very emotional for me,” she told ENS. “It was almost like the minute I stepped off that bus, I could just feel it, a sense of being understood in that space, with all those people. It was very powerful to me.”Although her parents shared details of their camp experience with her, she has no tangible record of their early lives, she said. “Sometimes, people post pictures on Facebook of their parents when they were kids, and it makes me so sad,” she told ENS.“I don’t have any idea what my mom was like growing up. Her family’s possessions were being stored in a church, but the church was burned. People in the community always believed the church was burned because it was known that they were helping the Japanese.”The community was Brawley, a rural farming area inland from San Diego. Her farmer grandparents were poor, with seven children and few resources. The family plunged into survival mode when her grandfather was arrested, days after Pearl Harbor, suspected of being a spy because he had a short-wave radio. Soon after, the family was sent to the camp in Poston, Arizona.“My mom was 9 years old when they went to the camp,” Crandall said. “When my grandfather was arrested, he told my grandmother that, as long as you stay in the United States, I’ll find you. But if she went back to Japan, he wasn’t going to look for her.”When the war ended and families were released, her grandmother had nowhere to go. They stayed in the camp, eventually returning to Los Angeles, Crandall said.In spite of the challenging times, the family still found a way to focus on joy, an important part of the story, she said. “They arrived to a brown desert, and when they left, they left a green oasis. That’s the Japanese way, to make it better than when you arrived. They planted gardens and tried to make it a home.”Yet, ever afterward, “my mother lived lean, very lean,” Crandall recalled. “She was absolutely someone who didn’t cling to things, to memorabilia and things like that. Whenever I would complain as a teenager, she’d say, ‘Imagine if you were told to pack a bag and take only what you could carry out the door? What would you carry?’”The shame associated with the camp experience prompted her parents to raise her and her siblings “as fully American,” but they felt caught between cultures, Crandall said.“I think that part of this intergenerational trauma is this face of, who am I and where do I belong? I’m not fully American because of the way I look. But my parents raised us to be fully American. Part of that was being Christian and eating a certain type of food and not speaking my native language,” she said.“I think they were worried that we would be identified as not American and not loyal, and people don’t understand that today, and I think sometimes people shame me for that.”The trip to Manzanar, part of a Transformational Journeys pilgrimage offered by All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, released some of that shame, she said. “I felt when we were at Manzanar the shame that I think that my family and all the internees must have felt, and the importance of naming it so we don’t pass it on.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopalians join thousands on pilgrimage to historical site at former Japanese internment camp Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Atlanta killer cop gets 12 years in Anthony Hill case

first_imgNov. 2 — The family and supporters of Anthony Hill filled a DeKalb County courtroom and an overflow room to hear the sentence for ex-cop Robert Olsen. Hill, a 26-year-old African-American veteran, was shot and killed by Olsen in the parking lot of his apartment complex March 9, 2015. Housing staff had called 911 seeking help for Hill, who was observed naked and wandering in an erratic manner. One of the many protests for justice for Anthony HillAn Air Force veteran of the U.S. war on Afghanistan, Hill had been diagnosed with PTSD, but had stopped taking his meds because of damaging side effects.Cop Olsen had been told the call was possibly for a mentally disabled person in crisis. He knew that backup was on the way. But immediately upon stopping his patrol car, he drew his gun, and within seconds he had shot and killed Anthony Hill. Olsen claimed he was in fear for his life.After six days of jury deliberation, Olsen was convicted of four of the six counts lodged against him by a grand jury.While a divided jury failed to convict Olsen of two counts of felony murder, Black jurors successfully made the case for guilt on aggravated assault, making a false statement and two counts of violation of oath. The potential maximum length of prison time for these four felony convictions was 35 years.Prior to Judge LaTisha Dear Jackson issuing the sentence, four hours of additional testimony concerning Olsen’s record were heard. This included citizen complaints against Olsen, impact statements by Hill’s mother, father and sister, and character statements by Olsen’s family and friends. The 57-year-old Olsen was expected to make a statement, but he opted not to.Hill’s family described the trauma of learning the details of Anthony’s death and the agony of years of delayed trials, as well as the spurious claim of self-defense by a policeman, who had many less-lethal choices than his gun.Both parents, Caroline Baylor Giummo and Anthony Hill Sr., addressed the pain of not hearing Olsen express any remorse for killing their son.Judge Dear Jackson then sentenced Olsen to 20 years, to serve 12 in prison and 8 on probation. Olsen was also given five years each on violations of oath and making a false statement, to be served concurrently. He is barred from ever having another job in law enforcement, must relinquish his 13 guns, including an AR-15, and cannot profit in any way from his case.While Hill’s family had urged the maximum sentence of 35 years, his parents agreed that “some time was better than no time.” (acj.com, Nov. 2)At a press conference following the sentencing, Baylor Giummo thanked the team of DeKalb prosecutors, who pursued the felony murder charges despite knowing there is almost never a win on that charge if a cop is the defendant. She also expressed the family’s appreciation for those who had rallied and protested demanding justice for her son.Besides the many who filled the courtrooms, there was a continuous presence outside the county building throughout the trial. Actions included a walkout of students from nearby Decatur High School on Friday, Nov. 2, who gathered on the court steps holding “Justice for Anthony Hill” signs.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Foul Play Not Suspected After Woman Found Dead on Bench at South Pasadena Gold Line Station

first_img Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimescenter_img Make a comment Public Safety Foul Play Not Suspected After Woman Found Dead on Bench at South Pasadena Gold Line Station By BRIAN DAY Published on Monday, September 7, 2020 | 11:17 am STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week An investigation was underway into the death of a woman who was found unconscious on a train platform bench in South Pasadena on Sunday, although there were no initial signs of foul play, police said.Officers and paramedics were summoned to the Metro Gold Line Station at Meridian Avenue and Mission Street about 6 p.m. for a person “possibly in need of medical attention,” the South Pasadena Police Department said in a written statement.“Officers and South Pasadena Fire Department personnel arrived within minutes and located an unconscious female laying on a platform bench,” according to the statement. “Medical attention was immediately provided; however, the subject never regained consciousness and died at the scene.”She was estimated to be in her 40s.A cause of death was not clear, however first-responders noted to signs of trauma or foul play, police said.The investigation has been turned over to detectives from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Transit Services Bureau, which provides law enforcement on the train line, authorities said.Anyone with information can reach the Transit Services Bureau at (323) 563-5000. Business News Subscribe CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Herbeauty10 Sweet Things You Should Tell Your Boyfriend ASAPHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop Important Things You Never Knew About MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA 74 Year Old Fitness Enthusiast Defies All Concept Of AgeHerbeautyHerbeauty 18 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it last_img read more

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Varadkar to be grilled at Chamber lunch

first_imgLinkedin NewsLocal NewsVaradkar to be grilled at Chamber lunchBy admin – March 28, 2012 527 TRANSPORT Minister, Leo Varadkar is facing some tough questions this weekend when he l addresses Shannon Chamber of Commerce. Encouraging tourism providers, operators and the business community to take time out to meet the Minister and voice their opinions on Shannon’s future, Shannon Chamber President Damian Gleeson says: “opinions only turn into action when they are heard by the decision makers. While the Minister has spoken to Chamber executives in advance of publishing the recent Booz & Co. Report, this will be his first opportunity to meet with the business community at Shannon,Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “This is possibly the last opportunity for engagement on a very pertinent issue for the Mid West region before the final decision is made,” said Mr Gleeson.In a presentation to the Minister earlier this year, Shannon Chamber made the case that Shannon Airport should be separated from its current structure but remain under some other form of State “protection” / ownership to ensure its survival as a key piece of national Infrastructure, for the Mid West in particular.“We emphasised that the airport should be run with a commercially driven ethos – which, in conjunction with no debt, adequate working capital and an improvement of its cost structure would eventually allow it to be self-sustaining,” the chamber president said.‘Of the two options now recommended by Booz & Company, the scenario whereby Shannon moves to a local concession model giving a role to the local authorities in Clare and Limerick, to local commercial interests and to Shannon Development in a holding company, offers the most potential for Shannon’s future development. It places decision making for the airport’s future at a local level,” he added.The Chamber members and business are hoping that the Minister, in his address, will elaborate on the findings of the Booz and Company report. The event is being sponsored by a key Shannon company, DB Schenker and supported by AerCap and Shannon Airport Authority. WhatsApp Twitter Facebookcenter_img Email Previous articleDeposit Guarantee – ODCL clarify queriesNext articleKnock figures to grow in Shannon’s shadow admin Advertisement Printlast_img read more

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